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Phoebe R. Stubblefield

Published: August 29th, 2018

Category: Faculty, People

Research Assistant Scientist
Office: Cancer Genetics Research Center Room G-17B
Phone: (352) 273-8270
Email: phoebes@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. University of Florida, 2002
  • M.A. University of Texas, 1993
  • B.A. University of California Santa Barbara, 1990

Research Interests

Forensic Anthropology, Human Skeletal Variation, Human Identification, Paleopathology


Personal Statement

As the last graduate student of Dr. William R. Maples, founder of the C.A. Pound Human Identification Laboratory, I am proud to return to continue Dr. Maples’ traditions in forensic analysis, while expanding the lab’s interests in research.  I have a collegial and interdisciplinary focus that I foresee will bring new collaborations to the Pound Lab.  I have a growing interest in interdisciplinary research within anthropology, especially in exploring the intersection of cultural anthropology with forensic science.  This interest set the tone of my “Anatomical Diaspora” article.  I have an active role in the American Association of Physical Anthropology Committee on Diversity, and act as a faculty mentor and facilitator for the Increasing Diversity in Anthropological and Evolutionary Sciences (IDEAS) project, an NSF funded effort that has supported first generation and/or racial minority individuals transitioning into the biological anthropology community.

My forensic consults include serving the North Dakota State Historical Society, the North Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation, the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, the Grand Forks County Sheriff’s Office, the Grand Forks County Coroner’s Office, and medical examiner districts throughout the state of Florida.

Previously an associate professor at the University of North Dakota, for twelve years I directed its Forensic Science Program, created a trace evidence teaching laboratory, and assisted undergraduates with entry into the spectrum of forensic science careers.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

  • 2018 to present—Research Assistant Scientist, University of Florida C.A. Pound Human Identification Laboratory.     
  • 2011 to 2018—Associate Professor, University of North Dakota                 
  • 2010-2011 Chair, Anthropology Department
  • 2003 to 2016 Director, Forensic Science Program, University of North Dakota
  • 2003 to 2011-Assistant Professor, University of North Dakota

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

  • American Paleopathology Association since 2017
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science since 2015
  • North Dakota Funeral Directors Association 2013-2018
  • Academy of Forensic Sciences since 1997, Fellow since 2007
  • American Association of Physical Anthropologists since 1994
  • International Association for Identification Associate Member since 2008
  • Bones and Behavior Group since 2008
  • Organization of American Historians 2005-2006      
  • 2014 to 2016—Section Chair of the Anthropology Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences
  • 2013-2014—Section Secretary of the Physical Anthropology Section of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences

Honors

  • 2003 Ellis R. Kerley Foundation Award, American Academy of Forensic Sciences
  • 2002 Goggin Fellowship, Department of Anthropology University of Florida
  • 2001 Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship
  • 1999 William R. Maples Scholarship, University of Florida

Selected Publications

Stubblefield, P. R. (2011), The Anatomical Diaspora: Evidence of Early American Anatomical Traditions in North Dakota. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 56: no. doi: 10.1111/j.1556-4029.2011.01738.x.  First published online March 29,2011.

Stubblefield, P.R. (2011).  “A Strategy for Improving Forensic Anthropology Research Opportunities.”  Forensic Science: Policy & Management 2:11-13.

Stubblefield, PR (1999) Homicide or Accident off the Coast of Florida: Trauma Analysis of Mutilated Human Remains.  Journal of Forensic Sciences 44(4):716-719

Behrensmeyer, A. K., J. Quade, Thure E. Cerling, Kappelman, J., I. Khan, P. Copeland, L. Roe, J. Hicks, Phoebe Stubblefield, B. Willis, C. LaTorre. 2007.  The structure and rate of late Miocene expansion of C4 plants: evidence from lateral variation in stable isotopes in paleosols of the Siwalik series, northern Pakistan.  GSA Bulletin, 119 (11): 1486–1505.

Rankin-Hill L and P Stubblefield (2000).  African-American History Uncovered: Skeletal Remains As a Vehicle to the Past, in The Tulsa Race Riot, A Scientific, Historical and Legal Analysis, JH Franklin and S Ellsworth, eds.  Report submitted to the Tulsa Race Riot Commission, November 2000

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

In this multi-year project, my colleagues and I contributed to the geological time scale for the Northern Pakistan.  I contributed geomagnetic dates for an area known for Miocene mammals and the ape Sivapithecus.

  • Behrensmeyer, A. K., J. Quade, Thure E. Cerling, Kappelman, J., I. Khan, P. Copeland, L. Roe, J. Hicks, Phoebe Stubblefield, B. Willis, C. LaTorre. 2007.  The structure and rate of late Miocene expansion of C4 plants: evidence from lateral variation in stable isotopes in paleosols of the Siwalik series, northern Pakistan.  GSA Bulletin, 119 (11): 1486–1505.

Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught

  • Analysis of Forensic Evidence
  • Anthropology of Death
  • Introduction to Forensic Anthropology
  • Introduction to the Forensic Sciences
  • Forensic Anthropology Field School
  • Forensic Science
  • Forensic Science Internship
  • Human Osteology
  • Human Variation
  • Medical Anthropology
  • Online courses:
  • Introduction to Biological Anthropology
  • Forensic Science
 

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