Undergraduates Click Here

Stephanie Bogart, Ph.D.

Published: August 29th, 2018

Category: Faculty, People

Lecturer
Office: Turlington B137
Email: sbogart@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Iowa State University, 2009
  • M.A. Anthropology, Iowa State University, 2005
  • B.A. Anthropology, Miami University, 2003
  • B.A. Zoology, Miami University, 2003

Research Interests

Non-human primates, great apes, chimpanzees, behavioral ecology, diet, tool use, communication, cognition, sociality/reproduction, conservation, Senegal, human evolution, human behavior


Personal Statement

Dr. Bogart’s primary research focus is to understand how the environment influences behavior in correlation with evolution. Chimpanzees, human’s closest living relative, are the focus of her research. Dr. Bogart integrates interdisciplinary methods and themes from anthropology, behavioral ecology, biology, and neuroscience. She has conducted research with both captive and wild primates, including capuchin monkeys, gorillas, orangutans, bonobos, and chimpanzees. Research topics include behavioral ecology of chimpanzees, chimpanzee tool-use, great ape communication, sociality, and prosociality.

Dr. Bogart has collaborated on research carried out at Yerkes National Primate Center, MD Anderson Biomedical Research Center, and the Milwaukee and Jacksonville Zoos. She has conducted over 14 years of research in Senegal, West Africa at the Fongoli savanna chimpanzee site at Mt. Assirik Research Site (MARS) in the Niokola-Koba National Park.

Conservation efforts are prominent in research primates and Dr. Bogart’s main focus is on developing action plans to sustain the chimpanzee populations in Senegal. Efforts involve working closely with local government agencies.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

  • Assistant Professor of Teaching, Biological Sciences, Human and Evolutionary Biology, University of Southern California, 2018
  • Lecturer, Biological Sciences, Human and Evolutionary Biology, University of Southern California, 2014-2017
  • Assistant Professor, Anthropology, Lawrence University, 2013-2014
  • Postdoctoral Associate, Neuroscience Institute and the Language Research Center, Georgia State University, 2012-2013
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Agnes Scott College, 2010-2012
  • Visiting Lecturer, Anthropology, University of California San Diego, Spring 2010
  • Visiting Lecturer, Anthropology, Iowa State University, Spring 2008

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors


Selected Publications

Pruetz JD, Bogart SL, Lindshield SM. In Press. Savanna chimpanzees at Fongoli, Senegal, use tools to reconcile an extreme environment. Chapter for Chimpanzees in Context, In Press

Pruetz JD, Bogart SL, Lindshield SM, Walkup K. Feeding-related tool use in primates. In: Lambert JE & Rothman J, Eds. Primate Diet and Nutrition: Needing, Finding, and Using Food. In Press

Taglialatela JP, Russell JL, Pope SM, Morton T, Bogart S, Reamer LA, Schapiro SJ, Hopkins WD. 2015. Multimodal communication in chimpanzees. Am J Primatol 77: 1143-1148.

Leroy F, Cai Q, Bogart S, et al. 2015. A new human-specific brain landmark: The depth asymmetry of the superior temporal sulcus. PNAS 112 (4): 1208-1213.

Bogart, S. L., Bennett, A. J., Schapiro, S. J., Reamer, L. A., Hopkins, W. D. (2014). Different early rearing experiences have long-term effects on cortical organization in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Developmental Science. Vol. 17 (2), pp. 161-174.

Bogart, S. L., Pruetz, J. D., Ormiston, L. K., Russell, J. L., Meguerditchian, A., Hopkins, W. D. (2012). Termite fishing laterality in the Fongoli savanna chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus): Further evidence of a left hand preference. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. Vol. 149, pp. 591-598.

Bogart, S. L., Mangin, J., Schapiro, S. J., Reamer, L., Bennett, A. J., Pierre, P. J., Hopkins, W. D. (2012). Cortical sulci asymmetries in chimpanzees and macaques: A new look at an old idea. Neuroimage. Vol. 61 (3), pp. 533-541.

Bogart, S. L., Pruetz, J. D. (2011). Insectivory of Savanna Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) at Fongoli, Senegal. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. Vol. 145 (1), pp. 11-20.

Bogart, S. L., Pruetz, J. D. (2008). Ecological context of savanna chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) termite fishing at Fongoli, Senegal. American Journal of Primatology. Vol. 70 (6), pp. 605-612.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

National Science Foundation – High-Risk Research in Anthropology:

  • Key Personnel (50%),
  • Habituation Feasibility Assessment for Critically Endangered Pan troglodytes verus in a Savanna Environment at Parc National du Nioklo-Koba, Senegal
  • $34,967 (May 2017 – May 2018)

USC Women in Science and Engineering Supplemental Faculty Support

  • Principal Investigator (100%) – $5,000 (May-July 2017)

Primate Conservation, Inc.:

  • Co-PI (50%),
  • Disease transmission prevention between critically endangered western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and research agents at Mont Assirik in Parc National du Niokolo-Koba, Sénégal
  • $4,355 (May 2017 – May 2018)

The Leakey Foundation:

  • Principal Investigator (100%).
  • Savanna chimpanzee ecology at MARS (Mount Assirik Research Site).
  • $24,783 (May 2015 – Nov 2016)

Courses Taught

 

 

Comments are currently closed.