Graduate Student
Email: megandcogburn@ufl.edu


Education

  • Ph.D. Anthropology, University of Florida, In Progress
  • M.A. Anthropology, University of Florida, 2016
  • B.A. Anthropology, Wheaton College, 2010

Subfield

Cultural Anthropology


Chair

Dr. Marit Østebø


Research Interests

Africa/East Africa/Tanzania, Medical Anthropology and STS, Anthropology of Development, Critical Global Health Studies, Maternity & Birth, Care, Health Governance, Gender and Feminist Studies


Selected Publications

Østebø, M.T., M. Cogburn, & A.S. Mandani; The silencing of political context in health research in Ethiopia: why it should be a concern, Health Policy and Planning, Volume 33, Issue 2, 1 March 2018, Pages 258–270, https://doi.org/10.1093/heapol/czx150

Cogburn, M., A., Strong, & S. Wood, “Choiceless Choice: Homebirth, Hospital Birth, and Birth Registration in Tanzania” in Birth in 8 Cultures. Eds. R. David-Floyd & M. Cheyney, Waveland Press, 2019.

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

  • Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Award, Tanzania, May to December 2019
  • University of Florida International Center Research Abroad for Doctoral Students Award, Tanzania, May to December 2019
  • University of Washington, Harvard, and Results for Development Transparency for Development Fellowship, Tanzania, January to August 2016

Photo of Kelly Chapman

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: kschapman@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Florida, In Progress
  • M.P.H., Public Health, Epidemiology, University of Florida, 2016
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2015
  • B.A., Biological Anthropology, University of Texas, 2012

Subfield

Cultural Anthropology

Medical Anthropology


Chair

Dr. Pete Collings


Research Interests

Kelly is an applied biocultural anthropologist with an interest in global health, perceptions of health and disease, gender inequality, psychosocial stress, and structural violence. Much of her research emphasizes using anthropological methods to strengthen evidence-based approaches in global health and development. Her PhD research explores the cultural perceptions surrounding water use and vaginal health in the Ouest region of Haiti.

Haiti, Women’s Health, Health Beliefs, Water, Cultural Perceptions


Selected Publications

Chapman, K. S., Wood, E. A., McKune, S. L., & Madsen Beau De Rochars, V. E. (2017). Common Beliefs
around Vaginal Illness and Water Quality in Haiti.
Air & Water Borne Diseases, 6(2).


Wood, E. A.,
Chapman, K. S., McKune, S. L., & Madsen Beau De Rochars, V. E. (2017). Community-based
Health Needs Assessment in Léogâne and Gressier, Haiti: Six Years Post-Earthquake.
Journal of International
Humanitarian Action, 2
(9).

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

  • Graduate School Doctoral Dissertation Award, University of Florida, 2019
  • Research Abroad for Doctoral Students (RAD) Award, University of Florida International Center, 2017
  • Exemplary Student Award, College of Public Health and Health Professions 2016-2017
  • Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship Recipient, Intensive summer program in Haitian Creole 2017
  • National Science Foundation: Graduate Research Fellowship, Honorable Mention 2013-2014
  • Ruegamer Scholarship, Biochemistry Scholarship, granted in 2013
  • American Business Woman’s Association Scholarship, Scholarship, granted in 2009
Assistant Professor
Office: Grinter Hall, 496
Phone: (352) 273-4754
Email: marit.ostebo@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. Anthropology of Gender and Development, University of Bergen, Norway, 2013
  • M.A. International Public Health, University of Bergen, Norway, 2007
  • B.Sc. Nursing, Menighetssøsterhjemmet College, Oslo, Norway, 1997

Research Interests

Gender equality and Women’s Rights, Gender Based Violence, Medical Anthropology, Global Health, Reproductive Health and Rights, Anthropology of Aid and Development, Anthropology of Human Rights, Feminist Anthropology, Religion and Development, Faith-Based Organizations, Team-Based-Learning


Personal Statement

I have a very interdisciplinary background with a BSc in Nursing, a MPh in International/Public Health and a PhD in Anthropology of Gender and Development. I have extensive field-research experience from Ethiopia, where I prior to pursuing an academic career, was involved in humanitarian and development work. My research reflects an interest in the relationship between normative frameworks, ideas, models and stories produced by the different actors within the human rights and development machinery and the complex realities that exist on ‘the ground’.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

  • University of Florida, Assistant Professor, 2015 –
  • University of Florida, Lecturer, 2014- 2015
  • University of Bergen, PhD Candidate/ Junior Research Fellow, 2009-2013
  • Haraldsplass Deaconess University College, Bergen, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing and Health, 2008 –2013
  • Betanien Deaconess University College, Bergen, Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing, spring 2008
  • Ethiopian Evangelical Church Mekane Yesus / Ethiopia, Raytu Community Development Project
  • Advisor and Head of the Health Department 2005-2006
  • Norwegian Church Aid/Ethiopia, Relief Coordinator, April-September 2000
  • Ethiopian Evangelical Church Mekane Yesus, Community Development worker, 2000-2003
  • Ullevål University Hospital – Oslo, Nurse in oncology ward, 1998
  • Rikshospitalet University Hospital – Oslo, Nurse in gastro-surgical ward, 1997

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

  • 2014-Current, Member, American Anthropological Association
  • 2014-Current, Member, African Studies Association

Honors

 


Selected Publications

Østebø, M.T. (2015) “Translations of Gender Equality among rural Arsi Oromo in Ethiopia.” Development and Change 46 (3): 442-463

Østebø M.T. & Østebø, T. (2014) “Are Religious Leaders a Magic Bullet for Social Change? A critical look at anti-FGM interventions in Ethiopia.” Africa Today 60 (3): 82-101

Østebø, M. T., Haukanes H. & Blystad A. (2013). “Strong State Policies on Gender and Aid: Threats and Opportunities for Norwegian Faith-based Organizations” Forum for Development Studies 40(2): 193-216

Selbervik, H. & Østebø, M.T. (2013). “Gender Equality in International Aid: What has Norwegian Gender Politics Got to Do With It?” Gender, Technology and Development 17 (2): 205-228

Østebø, M.T. (2010). Women’s Respect and Rights among the Arsi Oromo of southeast Ethiopia. Aspen,H. Birhanu Teferra, Shiferaw Bekele, Ege, S. (Eds.) Research in Ethiopian Studies. Wiesbaden: Harrossowitz Verlag

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

Translations of Gender Equality

My PhD research focused on translations of gender equality in development aid, with an empirical focus on Norway and Ethiopia. While gender equality as a concept often is taken for granted within the field of development, my research sheds light on the shifting meanings and translations of the concept. Drawing on translation theory, I among others engage with and challenge Sally Engle Merry’s work on vernacularization. I argue that contemporary theories of translation and discursively informed theories on global norm diffusion offer perspectives that allow us to recognize the potential of contestations in meaning creation. This opens up the translational space as the ‘grassroots’ are recognized as translators.

  • Østebø, M.T. & Haukanes, H. (2016) “Shifting Meanings of Gender Equality in Development. Perspectives from Norway and Ethiopia.” Progress in Development Studies, 16(1) 39-51
  • Østebø, M.T. (2015) “Translations of Gender Equality among rural Arsi Oromo in Ethiopia.” Development and Change 46 (3) 442-463
  • Østebø, M. T (2013) Translations of Gender Equality in International Aid. Perspectives from Norway and Ethiopia. University of Bergen, Bergen. PhD thesis
  • Selbervik, H. & Østebø, M.T. (2013). “Gender Equality in International Aid: What has Norwegian Gender Politics Got to Do With It?” Gender, Technology and Development 17 (2): 205-228

Religion, Gender and Development

Part of my research has focused on the role of religion in relation to development and gender. While religion for long was regarded as an anti-thesis to development, this has changed over the last two decades, reflected in increased recognition of and involvement of faith-based organizations and religious leaders within mainstream development. In my work I acknowledge, yet also problematize the turn to religion in development.

  • Østebø M.T. & Østebø, T. (2014) “Are Religious Leaders a Magic Bullet for Social Change? A critical look at anti-FGM interventions in Ethiopia.” Africa Today 60 (3): 82-101
  • Østebø M.T. & Østebø, T. (2014) “Are Religious leaders Key in Efforts to Eradicate Female Genital Cutting?” ICA (Instituut Culturele Antropologie) March-April Issue
  • Østebø, M. T., Haukanes H. & Blystad A. (2013). “Strong State Policies on Gender and Aid: Threats and Opportunities for Norwegian Faith-based Organizations” Forum for Development Studies 40(2): 193-216

Respect and Gender Justice

My long-term engagement as a development practitioner combined with ethnographic fieldwork among the Arsi Oromo of south-east Ethiopia generated an interest in exploring a local concept of respect and sacredness known as wayyuu. In addition to detailed ethnographic descriptions of the concept and its related institutions, my work reflects an interest in exploring respect as a concept with relevance for women’s rights and gender justice.

  • Østebø, M.T. (2010). Women’s Respect and Rights among the Arsi Oromo of southeast Ethiopia. Aspen,H. Birhanu Teferra, Shiferaw Bekele, Ege, S. (Eds.) Research in Ethiopian Studies. Wiesbaden: Harrossowitz Verlag
  • Østebø M.T. “Can Respect be Key to Gender Justice? Accepted for publications conditioned on minor revisions in the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

The Politics of Models in Development

I am currently working on a book project called “The Politics of Models in Development”. With an empirical focus on various efforts and initiatives undertaken in order to promote gender equality and women’s rights in Ethiopia, my overall aim is to provide a critical analysis and discussion of the politics of models and modeling within the field of international development. The book draws, among others, on research conducted in Awra Amba, a small rural community in Northern Ethiopia hailed as a model for gender equality and sustainable development.

  • Østebø, M.T (2015) Awra Amba – A model for gender equality and gender justice? Report submitted to International Law and Policy Institute

Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

The Research Council of Norway
  • 2018-2020
  • Developmentality and the Anthropology of Partnership (PI: Jon Harald Sande Lie, Norwegian Institute of International Affairs)
  • Role: Co-PI

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Courses Taught

 

UF Research Foundation Professor, Anthropology and Tropical Conservation and Development Program
Office: Grinter Hall, Room 337
Phone: (352) 392-0299
Lab: Turlington Hall, Room B375
Email: stepp@ufl.edu
Website
Google Scholar


Education

  • Ph.D.
  • M.A.
  • B.A.

Research Interests

Cultural ecology, ecological anthropology, ethnobotany, medical anthropology, visual anthropology, Mesoamerica


Personal Statement

Rick (John Richard) Stepp is UF Research Foundation Professor of Anthropology at the University of Florida. He is a core faculty member of the Tropical Conservation and Development Program and the Land Use and Environmental Change Institute. He is also an affiliate faculty member of the School of Natural Resources and Environment and several other interdisciplinary centers focused on environmental research. He has conducted conservation research over the last two decades throughout the tropics, especially in the Maya Forest and in the Greater Mekong Region of Southeast Asia. His research explores persistence, change and variation of traditional ecological knowledge and ethnobiology. Much of this work has focused on wild food plants and medicinal plants. His work has also focused on patterns and causes in the distribution of biological and cultural diversity (biocultural diversity). He is leading the Quest 3 experiential learning initiative at UF and also serves as online coordinator for the Department of Anthropology. He is an associate editor for several journals in environmental anthropology and ethnobiology. He is past-president of the Society for Economic Botany and current president of the International Society of Ethnobiology.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

Honors

 


Selected Publications

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Courses Taught

Associate Professor
Office: Turlington Hall, Room B370
Phone: (352) 294-7600
Lab: Turlington Hall, Room B103
Email: cgravlee@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. University of Florida
  • M.A. University of Florida
  • B.A. University of Florida

Research Interests

Medical anthropology; social inequalities in health; ethnicity, race, and racism; human biological variation; cultural dimensions of psychosocial stress; social network analysis; cognitive anthropology; qualitative and quantitative research methods


Personal Statement

 


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Selected Publications

More Publications Available on Google Scholar



Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught