Hi All,

It’s the Friday the 13th/Full Moon Edition of the Scrapbook.  This spooky combo only happens every 20-30 years, so be sure to save your copy:  this rare issue might be worth money someday on Ebay!

Some Items from around the Department:

Upcoming Events

Potlatch this year is October 12 — less than a month away!  For those of you new to UF, Potlatch is one of our annual rites of intensification and a significant fundraiser to help support our graduate students by auctioning off departmental artifacts, relics, and other items of dubious provenance  If you have legacy items for the auction, you may drop them off in our main office in Turlington. If you have an item you’d like to donate, you may also bring that to the main office in Turlington, preferably with a note about what it is and what it might be used for.  Alternatively, if  you’d like to directly to the Graduate Student Travel Fund, you may write a check, payable to the Graduate Student Travel Fund, sent directly to Karen Jones in our main office.  Watch this space for a signup sheet for volunteers.

Got coffee? The University of Florida Coffee Research Symposium will be held October 17-19.  Organized by our very own Chris LeClere, the deadline to submit a presentation or poster proposal for the first ever UF Coffee Research Symposium is quickly approaching! This three day event is being held at Aloft Hotel and will bring together international industry professionals and researchers who have a common interest in coffee (or caffeine). There will be coffee tastings, demonstrations, and discussions. The cost is free for all UF students, faculty, and staff and lunch is provided Saturday and Sunday. Both graduate and undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to apply.   www.ufcoffeeresearch.com for more information or email the conference organizer Chris LeClere cleclere@ufl.edu

Publications

Dr. John Krigbaum and graduate student Kylie Williamson are co-authors on a new paper, “The dead shall be raised”: Multidisciplinary analysis of human skeletons reveals complexity in 19th century immigrant socioeconomic history and identity in New Haven, Connecticut, published earlier this week in PLoS One.  (Find the article here; a summary from Yale University is here). dr. George Kamenov in Geological Sciences at UF is also an author on this paper.  Congratulations to all!

Intersections

Intersections Group on Ethics in the Public Sphere will hold their first Ethics Cafe event on Immigration on, Monday, September 16th in Smathers 100.  An Ethics Café is an informal gathering where people with diverse perspectives and experiences can talk about issues that matter to them. The goal is to facilitate reasoned, constructive, and civil conversations in which all the participants are able to join, and from which all will learn. Facilitators will be on hand to assist, but the cafes are student driven and open-ended.  Interested?  Want to know more?  You can contact Danielle Barrientos, Intersections Program Coordinator at humanities-center@ufl.edu or find their newsletter here.

Job Board

The Department of Anthropology at California State University, Long Beach is happy to announce a tenure track position in Biological Anthropology at the Assistant Professor rank. Successful candidates must have completed their Ph.D. by August 1, 2020. The faculty member is expected to teach undergraduate classes in support of anthropology and human development majors. Please see the full position description for examples. The applicants’ research area is open but ideal candidates will demonstrate experience working with living human populations and solid foundation in evolutionary theory and biological and biocultural theories and methods. We are particularly interested in applicants committed to undergraduate teaching, graduate student mentoring and the ability to involve students in research projects. Applicants whose work and experience demonstrates a strong commitment to the success of diverse students are particularly encouraged to apply.  For a full description of the position and information on how to apply, please go to the following link: http://www.csulb.edu/academic-affairs/faculty-affairs/assistant-professor-of-biological-anthropology-2578

The Department of Anthropology at Indiana University Bloomington seeks applicants for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Social-Cultural Anthropology with a demonstrated expertise in food and culture, a commitment to ethnographic research, and success in interdisciplinary collaboration and comparative work.

While preference will be given to scholars whose research addresses US food systems or comparative US/global food systems, we will also consider applicants working in other regions. Topical specializations might include: the intersections of contemporary food systems, environment/climate, and social change, food justice, food (in)security, and sustainability, and/or the political economies of food production, trade, and consumption at local, national, and international levels. More at https://careercenter.aaanet.org/jobs/12758088/assistant-professor-anthropology-of-food.  Applications due October 15th.

 

Enjoy your weekend,

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

Awards Section

MD-PhD trainee and anthropology student Chu Hsiao was awarded a 5-year $219,000 NIH F30 NRSA award, “Biocultural investigation of maternal adversity on gene expression and RNA methylation in the placenta” under the mentorship of Drs. Connie Mulligan and Maureen Keller-Wood. The F30/31 NRSA is one of the most prestigious fellowships an MD-PhD trainee can possibly obtain. She is the first student in CLAS (never mind Anthropology) to have received this grant. Congratulations Chu!

Introducing the New Florida Journal of Anthropology

I’m pleased to announce the establishment of the New Florida Journal of Anthropology.  As many of you old-timers know, FASA published the Florida Journal of Anthropology between 1976-1995.  Megan Hanna Fry has volunteered to be the editor of the reboot, which will be both peer-reviewed and published online.  Megan is also working with our Anthropology Librarian, Dr. Ginessa Mahar, to digitize the journals from the original run.  Watch this space for future updates.

Save the Date for Potlatch

Mark your calendars!  Potlatch is coming on October 12.  Which means:

If you have legacy items for the auction, you may drop them off in our main office in Turlington.

If you have an item you’d like to donate, you may also bring that to the main office in Turlington, preferably with a note about what it is and what it might be used for.

Alternatively, if  you’d like to directly donate cold, hard cash, to the Graduate Student Travel Fund, you may write a check, payable to the Graduate Student Travel Fund, sent directly to Karen Jones in our main office.

If you’re interested in volunteering, there will be a signup sheet for volunteers forthcoming.

Dorian Recovery Efforts

Many of you have already seen this from Dean Richardson on the devastation in the Bahamas, but I wanted to repost it here:  The level of devastation was immense, and the dangers for the residents of the islands will be many in the days and weeks to come.  UF faculty, staff and students are already participating in relief efforts.

Here are news resources from the New York Times that show the impact of the storm on the Bahamas and its people (access to the New York Times is free for students, faculty and staff – see how to get access at  https://news.hr.ufl.edu/technology/did-you-know-uf-offers-free-online-subscriptions-to-the-new-york-times-wall-street-journal/) :

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/09/04/world/americas/bahamas-damage-hurricane-dorian.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/04/world/americas/bahamas-stunned-as-water-recedes-its-like-a-bomb-went-off.html

The NYT has also provided a list of relief agencies, which you can find here.  One of the listed agencies, HeadKnowles, provides timely relief with critical supplies to the people of the Bahamas.  Two CLAS graduate students from the Bahamas, Justin Smith (Chemistry) and Kirsten G. Klein (Psychology) are working locally to assist in getting supplies to the agency for transport from Florida.  You can contact Justin at for information on how to help.

 

Upcoming Lectures

FLMNH Seminar Series This afternoon, September 6th, the next seminar in the FLMNH seminar series will be held at 3PM in the Dickinson Hall seminar room, 371. Dr. Bruce MacFadden (Distinguished Curator, Vertebrate Paleontology, Florida Museum of Natural History) will be presenting “Broader Impacts of Science on Society: The Florida Museum Connection”

Scudder Lecture Series: What are we to make of the 81% of Evangelical Christians who support Donald Trump? What effects have Trump’s administration had on American Evangelicalism?  The Department of Religion, as part of its annual Scudder Lecture Series, invites you to this timely event: Donald Trump and the Death of Evangelical Christianity, given by Dr. Randall Balmer.  Dr. Balmer is the  John Phillips Professor in Religion and Director, Society of Fellow at Dartmouth College.  The lecture will be delivered in the Pugh Hall Ocora on Tuesday, September 10th at 6 pm.  The event is co-sponsored by the Bob Graham Center for Public Service.

 

That’s all for now. Enjoy your weekend!

 

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

It’s the Friday Scrapbook, wind and rain edition!

Hurricane Dorian Preparation

By now you’ve likely seen updates from our office, the college and University, but it is worth repeating here: UF monitors closely the weather situation and provides regular updates on the UF Home Page (www.ufl.edu) including any schedule changes and/or closures.  The UF community also receives emails and/or texts through the emergency notification system, UF Alert and the UF GATORSAFE safety mobile app. GATORSAFE can be downloaded from the iOS App Store or Google Play

These are the steps the university has recommended to follow in previous years:

BEFORE THE STORM

Ensure storm supply kit is stocked – checklist: https://emergency.ufl.edu/preparedness/build-your-disaster-kit.

Download the GatorSafe Hurricane Survivor Brochure: https://emergency.ufl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/GatorSafe-Hurricane-Brochure-v.2016.pdf.

Ensure your vehicle has a full tank of fuel.

Inform family and friends of your hurricane plans, especially if sheltering in a different location than usual.

Remove or secure outside items such as potted plants, grills and lawn furniture.

DURING THE STORM

Stay indoors and do not travel during the storm.

If winds become strong, stay away from doors and windows. Take refuge in an interior room, closet or hallway.

Do NOT use candles, which can increase fire risk.

Understand that emergency services and scheduled bus routes might not be able to respond or operate during the storm.

For more information on Dorian’s projected path, UF Weather (https://ufweather.org/) is a good source for updates.

More specific to the Department, if you have an office or lab in Turlington basement, it would be a good idea to move anything valuable (like electronics) off the floor and away from windows (for those of you who a lucky enough to have one, that is).  UF has theoretically solved all of the basement flooding problems but the reality is that leaks are still possible.  Stains on ceiling tiles are a strong indicator that water could potentially rain down from those spots. Better safe than sorry.

Turlington Power Outage

Also a reminder: Turlington will be closed from Friday evening through Monday afternoon for replacement of electrical circuit panels.  The replacement is still on schedule, despite the hurricane.  In addition to moving stuff to avoid possible flooding, keep in mind no one will be allowed in or out of the building.  If you have perishable food, please remove it, unplug your electronics, and so forth.  If you have a refrigerator in your office or lab, keep in mind it will defrost and be prepared for a puddle on the floor or counter next week

Travel Applications Due Today by 4:00 pm

As a reminder — if you are applying for travel funds for this fall, the applications are due today by 4:00.  Faculty should send their completed application as a single file to Karen Jones.  Graduate students should send their completed application as a single file to Juanita Bagnall.  Late or incomplete applications will not be accepted.

Grant News

Dr. Connie Mulligan just received a $348,000 NSF award, “Intergenerational impact of violence exposure during pregnancy on epigenetic change.”  Dr. Mulligan is collaborating with Dr. Catherine Panter-Brick at Yale University and Dr. Rana Dajani at Hashemite University in Jordan.  Congratulations Connie!

Anthropologists in the News

Our own Mike Heckenbeger was featured in a story in the Alligator this morning, highlighting his research and efforts to mitigate the effects of rainforest fires on indigenous peoples.  Find the article here.

Job Board

The Lehman College Department of Anthropology invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professorship in Cultural Anthropology beginning Fall 2020. Candidates must have an active record of research/scholarship/creative works and a strong commitment to teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

We are seeking a scholar-educator whose scholarship encompasses the areas of migration and diaspora or race and ethnicity. We seek applicants with a commitment to and experience promoting and fostering equity and inclusion in pedagogy and scholarship, who can through their teaching, scholarship, and service connect anthropology to the lives of the very diverse Lehman student body and their broader communities.  Further information at the link: https://cuny.jobs/bronx-ny/assistant-professor-anthropology/EC56D7CB4B1343F79FA6263A4FFD01C6/job/

We write on behalf of Thomas Hansen, chair of the Department of Anthropology, at Stanford University. We are currently recruiting for an assistant professor, tenure-track faculty appointment in Archaeology as well as for an assistant professor position in Muslim Societies.  We hope you will bring these positions to the attention of any outstanding students whom we should strongly consider for these positions. The closing date for both searches is October 25, 2019. The formal ads are copied below and attached to this email.

Stanford Univeristy has two open positions:

The Department of Anthropology at Stanford University invites applications for a tenure-track faculty appointment in archaeology. The appointment will be made at the Assistant Professor rank. The successful applicant must be engaged in research that complements and expands the existing profile of the Department, including theoretical and methodological strengths and an active program of fieldwork. Candidates should demonstrate interests that engage a broad range of colleagues and the ability to teach and mentor a diverse student body.

For full consideration, materials must be received by October 25, 2019. The term of appointment would begin September 1, 2020. Send vita, letter describing qualifications and interests, one example of written work, and the names of three referees to Professor Lynn Meskell, Chair, Archaeology Search Committee, Department of Anthropology, 450 Serra Mall, Building 50, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2034.

Application materials should be submitted to AcademicJobsOnline.org.

Stanford University invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor faculty position focused on the culture, economics or politics of Muslim societies. We especially welcome applications from scholars who are studying Muslim societies in Iran and Central Asia, as well as South, Southeast and East Asia.

The successful applicant for this position will be appointed in one of the following departments within the School of Humanities and Sciences: Anthropology, Communication, Economics, Political Science, or Sociology. The successful applicant will have teaching and advising responsibilities in their home department and will also be expected to contribute to the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies’ curricular and outreach efforts.

Applicants should provide a cover letter including a brief statement of research interests, a curriculum vitae including list of publications, and one recent writing sample. Applicants should arrange to have three letters of reference submitted to AcademicJobsOnline.org

Quiz time!

What do the following tunes have in common?

Beatles: Eleanor Rigby

Bothy Band: Julia Delaney’s

John Coltrane: Impressions

Jimi Hendrix: Purple Haze

Carlos Sanata: Oye Como Va

Answer on Tuesday or Wednesday next week!

 

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi All,

 

Welcome back to a new Academic Year!  Some news and notes from in and around the department:

Congratulations to our Summer 2019 Graduates

Please join me in congratulating our most recent students to earn the Doctorate in Anthropology: Myrian Barboza, Ben Burgen, Kelly Chapman, Jorge Garcia, Elise Geissler, Karen Leslie, Ginessa Mahar, Aaron Victoria, and Iliana Vargas were awarded their their Ph.D. degrees the the University’s August Commencement.  Samantha McCrane and Nolan Ruark were awarded their M.A. degree in Anthropology.  Congratulations to all of our students!

Welcome to New Faces in our Department

We are fortunate to welcome multiple new faces to Anthropology this year.   Joining our faculty are Drs. Dan Contreras, Alix Johnson, Gabriel Prieto, Saul Schwartz, and Kim Valenta.  We are very excited to have these outstanding scholars join our faculty.  Please join me in welcoming them to the Department, and please take the time to point them in the right direction as they adjust to the Turlington maze.

Post-doctoral scholar Dr. Emily Zovodny also joins us this fall.  She will be working closely with Dr. John Krigbaum, in the Bone Chemistry Lab for the next two years.  Dr. Zavodny is a zooarchaeologist who works primarily in the Balkans, specifically in Croatia.  In addition to her SBE Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, Emily Dr. Zavodny is the recipient of a National Geographic Early Career Grant.

We also welcome Dr. Ginessa Mahar, the new Anthropology Librarian in the George A. Smathers Libraries.  Dr. Mahar will be working closely with us over the coming years. In her position as librarian, she can provide assistance with acquisitions and instruction in addition to providing services and support for proposal writing, data management, digital humanities, publishing and data archiving, and data visualization and informatics.

Sunday Welcome Back Picnic

Last year we revived an old tradition: the Welcome Back Picnic, which we will proudly continue.  This year’s Welcome Back Picnic (Vol. 2, No. 2) will be at Depot Park This Sunday, August 25th from 1-4 pm.   We will  provide hot dogs, hamburgers, and veggie burgers, expertly prepared by grillmaster Trevor Duke! We will provide non-alcoholic drinks, but the Box Car is close by if you wish to enjoy an adult beverage. We are asking everyone to bring a side dish or dessert to share and show off your mad casserole and/or dessert skills.  We hope you can join us!  If you are interested in helping with set-up or clean-up, you can contact Karen Jones (knjones@ufl.edu).

Turlington Renovations and Clean-up

If you’ve been in and around Turlington, you’re well aware that it is still something of a disaster.  We experienced HVAC renovation work one the course of the summer.  Most of that work is completed, but construction of new homes for Jewish Studies and African-American studies are ongoing on the first floor.  Construction is expected to continue through the end of December.  We are also still cleaning up around our basement and first floor spaces.

The good news is that we are back in our main office on the first floor, and we are (mostly) at full speed.  Special thanks to our office staff (Juanita Bagnall, Pam Freeman, Karen Jones, and Pat King) and all of the students who helped pack, move, move again, and clean up over the summer.

Be aware that we’re not quite out of the woods yet:  Turlington will be shut down over Labor Day Weekend.  Beginning Friday evening on Aug. 30, Turlington will close while a work crew installs a new power supply.  There will be no power to the building, and no one will be allowed access until Tuesday morning, September 3.  I would advise unplugging any electronics you have in the building, just to be safe.  I would also advise doing something like enjoying the long weekend.

FASA Updates

The Florida Anthropological Student Association (FASA) is a graduate anthropology club that sponsors a number of social, fundraising and educational events throughout the year. Annual social events include both Potlatch and the Armadillo Roast, in addition to numerous other events.  FASA provides opportunities for students to meet other anthropology students and faculty members in social settings.  Consider becoming involved!  FASA will hold elections for the 2019-2020 officers, so graduate students should be on the lookout for a link to nominations, followed by a link for voting.  Any member of the graduate program in good standing may stand for election to FASA!  Interested?  Want to know more?  Contact current President Hannah Toombs (toombshannah@ufl.edu) for more information.

John Krigbaum Receives Grant to Improve Access to 3D Computing

Congratulations to Dr. John Krigbaum, who collaborated with colleagues across UF (in CLAS, Smathers, FMNH, Medicine, and Education) and was awarded funding for the proposal “Expanding Capacity for 3D Data Analysis.”  Advances in Computed Tomography (CT) provide critical opportunities to improve educational innovation at UF for students, faculty and staff. CT is a technique that produces high fidelity volumetric representations of living or inanimate objects, allowing enormous amounts of external and internal information to be recovered in three dimensions. Advances in 3D digitization coupled with new analytical techniques are rapidly transforming science and education. 3D innovations in technology have huge potential for fostering research initiatives and developing lifelong skills that will have an immediate impact on the student experience at UF and beyond.

The grant will fund the installation three 3D workstations with the high-end volumetric analysis software suite VG StudioMax (www.volumegraphics.com) in the George A. Smathers Libraries to maximize accessibility and foster innovation and collaboration.  These Workstations will provide novel and public environments for students to engage in using and learning 3D technology and develop research projects to garner extramural funding. The Marston Science Library 3D lab also has facilities designed to provide learners the opportunity to create virtual reality applications, analyze large research datasets, or develop collaborative projects.  This is terrific news, and congratulations to Dr. Krigbaum for making it happen.

Jobs in Anthropology

Emory University’s Department of Anthropology is hiring three biological anthropologists. This cluster will include two positions at the Assistant Professor level and one at the Associate Professor level. Our program is highly regarded with robust undergraduate and graduate programs and the new hires will be expected to contribute to each. The department also values innovative and rigorous research and houses excellent resources including ancient and modern DNA labs, the Laboratory for Comparative Human Biology, the Laboratory for Darwinian Neuroscience, and the Paleolithic Technology Laboratory.

Those interested can apply at https://apply.interfolio.com/66080.  Applications will be accepted through November 1, 2019.

California State Polytechnic University, Pomona is hiring a Tenure-Track Assistant Professor in Biological Anthropology. The faculty member will teach undergraduate classes in biological anthropology, such as introduction to biological anthropology, human evolution and variation, primatology, health systems, and forensic anthropology. Research will be in a medicine/health field, with strong focus on disparities, and/or human rights, and/or environmental health.  The successful candidate will demonstrate an interest in involving undergraduates in research and/or field activity, an ability to work in an interdisciplinary environment, enthusiasm for a hands-on, learn-by-doing approach to education, and teacher/scholarship.  Applicants whose work demonstrates a commitment to inclusive excellence and diversity in higher education are particularly encouraged to apply.  For a full description of the position and application portal, please go to the following link. http://apply.interfolio.com/66886

AAA Membership Awards

Are you an archaeology student who plans on presenting at the 2019 AAA/CASCA Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada? If so, please apply for one or more of the Archaeology Division’s student awards.

All students who are presenting in Vancouver are eligible to apply for the free AAA Membership Award. We have 20 to give away (value $75-$135)! Please click here for more details: ad.americananthro.org/awards/#Student_Membership

Our other award is the Diversity Student Travel Grant, which is open to student presenters who are from historically under-represented groups. We have 4 of these travel grants to give away (value of up to $600)! Please click here for more details: ad.americananthro.org/awards/#Student_Diversity Please note that this application is more involved and requires a letter of reference.

Both student award applications are due on September 15, 2019 and all winners will be recognized at the Archaeology Division’s Business Meeting in Vancouver.

 

That’s all for now.  If you have an item for the scrapbook, let me know and we’ll add to the next edition.  In the meantime, I look forward to seeing you on Sunday.

Peter Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi All,

After a “Let’s just get through finals week and the end of the semester” break, the scrapbook is back with a special Awards and Warm Fuzzies Edition:

Dr. Kim Valenta Joins the Anthropology Department

I am pleased to welcome Dr. Kim Valenta, who will join us in August.  Dr. Valenta comes to us from Duke University. She earned her Ph.D. from Stanford University. Her research program examines the interactions between wild plants and primates (monkeys and lemurs) and how these are affected by human activities. She combines field observations of animal foraging behavior in the tropics with diverse analytical techniques – including chemistry and spectroscopy – to quantify plant attractants and deterrents. Dr. Valenta is also the co-founder and co-director of the Mad Dog Initiative (www.maddoginitiative.com), an applied conservation non-profit organization in Madagascar.

Milestones

Please join me in congratulating our most recent students to earn the Doctorate in Anthropology: Lesley-Gail Atkinson, Jelena Brezjanovic-Shogren, Kia Fuller, Nathan Lawres, and Katie Rubin were awarded their Ph.D. degrees last Friday.  Please join me in appealing their hard work and perseverance.

On Sunday morning we recognized several students who earned their M.A. this spring: Amanda Brock, Catrina Cuadra, Raphaela Meloro, and Michael Stoop were awarded their degrees.  Happily for them, the M.A. degrees were recognized first thing Sunday morning at the (now infamous) College Recognition Ceremony, so our students (mostly) avoided getting rained on.  Congratulations to all four!

Graduate School Doctoral Research Travel Award Winners

Arianne Boileau and Nicolas Del Sol recently were named Summer 2019 Graduate School Doctoral Research Travel Award winners. Congratulations to both!

Lambda Alpha Winners

Rebecca Henderson and Sarah Zaleski both were awarded Lambda Alpha Research Grants.  Lambda Alpha is the National Anthropology Honor Society.  Congratulations to both!

Anthropology Students in the News

We’ve had several of our students profiled in University Publications recently.  Andreana Cunningham and Chris Clukay were profiled for their research, which has been supported by NSF Graduate Research Fellowships.  You can find the link to Andre and Chris’ research here.

Cady Gonzalez, Megan Cogburn, and Netty Carey were profiled by the CLAS media office for their research, which is supported by Fulbright-Hayes Fellowships.  You can find the story here.

The Main Office has Moved for the Summer

As a final note, the Main Office has moved for the Summer — we are down in the basement of Turlington.  You’ll find us in B328 and B329.  The first floor of Turlington is enduring HVAC renovations, necessitating our retreat to the underground.  Please note that the first floor will be off limits through the summer.  If you’re planning on scheduling a meeting or defense, contact Pam Freeman, and she will help make arrangements.

Update on Karen Jones

Many of you are aware that our office manager extraordinaire, Karen Jones, is out on leave.  She is doing well, but she will be out of the office for the immediate future.  In the meantime, if you have business issues normally handled by Karen, or you contacted Karen after April 1 and haven’t heard back from her (or us), please direct your inquiry to Pam Freeman and we will assist you.

 

Safe Travels this Summer, and I look forward to seeing you in August.

Pete Collings

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Interim Chair

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

Here are a couple things on a warm and quiet Friday:

Student Research Presentations

Graduate Students in ANG 6421 Landscape – Place – Dwelling will present their final papers on Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in 1208A Turlington Hall Conference Room, from 10:00 am-12:30pm.  See schedule below.  Everyone is welcome to attend one, some, or all of these presentations.

10:00-10:15    Ben Smith: “Indexing Places of Memory: A New Perspective on the Movement of Raw Stone Materials in the African Late Pleistocene”

10:15-10:20    Q&A

10:20-10:35    Kevin McDaniel: “Wayfinding in the Late Formative Amazon Rainforest: Reading Plants as Indexes of the Other”

10:35-10:40     Q&A

10:40-10:55    Emily Bartz: “Encircling the Sacred, Appropriating the Dead: Suturing the Past to the Present at Archaic Stallings Island, Middle Savannah River Valley”

10:55-11:00    Q&A

11:00-11:10    break

11:10-11:25    Jessi Jenkins: “Shell Mound’s Shells: Shifting Indexes at a Persistent Place on Florida’s Gulf Coast”

11:25-11:30     Q&A

11:30-11:45    Amber Grafft-Weiss: “Kingsley Plantation as a ‘Landscape in Process’: Background and Foreground in the Quotidian Lives of Enslaved Africans”

11:45-11:50    Q&A

11:50-12:05    Simon Goldstone: “Placemaking Jewish Identity: A Landscape Analysis of Jewish Cemeteries in North Florida”

12:05-12:10    Q&A

12:10-12:30    Discussion

 

Upcoming Talk

“Museums Seeding Authority: a paradigm for practice of justice and generosity.”

Join museum thought-leaders for a conversation about what decolonial museum practice looks like nationally and internationally, and a conversation about recent projects that are positively impacting Indigenous communities and museums.  The presentation will be Thursday, April 18th at 4:00pm in the Smathers Library, room 100.

Speakers include: 

  • Noelle Kahanu, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Noelle Kahanu is a Native Hawaiian writer, artist, film-maker and scholar. From 1999-2014, she worked at Bishop Museum in Honolulu where she was deeply involved in facilitating relationships between the museum and the Hawaiian community that resulted in scores of programs and exhibitions. These included the renovations of Hawaiian Hall (2009), Pacific Hall (2013), and the landmark exhibition, E Kū Ana Ka Paia (2010). Noelle holds a law degree from the William S. Richardson School of Law. She joined the American Studies Department of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa in 2014 as an assistant specialist in Public Humanities and Native Hawaiian programs. In this role she engages in community outreach, grant writing and management, and teaches courses on Museums and Education and Indigenous Curation.

  • Ben Garcia, Museum of Man, San Diego, CA

Ben Garcia (MS Ed.) is Deputy Director at the San Diego Museum of Man. He has worked for sixteen years in various roles as an arts educator, museum educator, exhibit developer, and administrator. His museum experience includes six years in the Education Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum, three years as Associate Director of Education at the Skirball Cultural Center, and three years as Head of Interpretation at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at UC Berkeley. He has presented and published on the museums as they relate to learning, public value, decolonization, undoing institutional racism, and social change. He is a steering committee member of Museums & Race and a member of the Advisory Board for the Adoption Museum Project.

 

Enjoy your weekend,

 

Pete Collings

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Interim Chair

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

Hi All,

 

Some News and Notes:

Graduate Teaching Awards

Our own Kylie Williamson won a Graduate Teaching Award from the Graduate School.  Please join me in congratulating Kyle on this terrific achievement!

 

CLAS Faculty Assembly

As previously announced, the Spring 2019 CLAS Faculty Assembly will be held on April 11 at 2 pm in the Keene Faculty Center in Dauer Hall. The meeting agenda includes:

  •  Dean Richardson’s address to faculty
  • Approval of Fall meeting minutes
  • Reports from CLAS Committees for the 2018-2019 academic year (Curriculum, Tenure & Promotion, Faculty Council, Finance, Nominating)
  • Call for floor nominations for CLAS committees and Faculty senate
  • Proposed items from assembly members present

Following the assembly there will be a reception for recently hired faculty.

 

Upcoming Talks

Heide Castañeda

The Center for Latin American Studies will be hosting anthropologist Dr. Heide Castañeda for a talk on Thursday, April 11th at 3:30pm (MCDA 2201). Dr. Castañeda will be visiting us from the University of South Florida where she is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology. The talk will cover her recent February 2019 book, Borders of Belonging: Struggle and Solidarity in Mixed-Status Immigrant Families (Stanford University Press: https://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=28405).

Additionally, if anyone is interested in meeting with Dr. Castañeda, please contact nicholas.vargas@latam.ufl.edu . There are some openings on her Thursday’s itinerary.

“Image, Ornament, Matter: A Symposium on their Limits and Intersections in the History of Art”

The symposium, “Image, Ornament, Matter: A Symposium on their Limits and Intersections in the History of Art,” begins on April 12th with a keynote lecture from Dr. Spyros Papapetros, Princeton University, and continues on April 13that the Harn Museum.  See information below and attached poster.

Image, Ornament, Matter: A Symposium on their Limits and Intersections in the History of Art

April 12-13, 2019 at the Harn Museum of Art

Keynote: Warburg and World Ornament: An Ethnography of Spaces

Dr. Spyros Papapetros, Princeton University

Friday, April 12t h2019

6PM, Chandler Auditorium, Harn Museum of Art

Reception to Follow

Following Gottfried Semper’s formulation of “directional adornment (Richtungsschmuck),” this presentation examines ornament as an orientation device for navigating physical and epistemological spaces by drawing from a series of original archival documents recording Aby Warburg’s encounter with the ritual practice and ethnographic literature on Ornamentik from a global perspective.

Other Speakers Include: 

Spyros Papapetros, Princeton University

Benjamin C. Tilghman, Washington College / The Material Collective

Megan McNamee, Warburg Institute

Meekyung MacMurdie, University of Chicago

Susanna McFadden, Bryn Mawr College

Irene Backus, Oklahoma State University

Ashley Jones, University of Florida

 

“Museums Seeding Authority: a paradigm for practice of justice and generosity.”

Join museum thought-leaders for a conversation about what decolonial museum practice looks like nationally and internationally, and a conversation about recent projects that are positively impacting Indigenous communities and museums.  The presentation will be Thursday, April 18th at 4:00pm in the Smathers Library, room 100.

Speakers include: 

  • Noelle Kahanu, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Noelle Kahanu is a Native Hawaiian writer, artist, film-maker and scholar. From 1999-2014, she worked at Bishop Museum in Honolulu where she was deeply involved in facilitating relationships between the museum and the Hawaiian community that resulted in scores of programs and exhibitions. These included the renovations of Hawaiian Hall (2009), Pacific Hall (2013), and the landmark exhibition, E Kū Ana Ka Paia (2010). Noelle holds a law degree from the William S. Richardson School of Law. She joined the American Studies Department of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa in 2014 as an assistant specialist in Public Humanities and Native Hawaiian programs. In this role she engages in community outreach, grant writing and management, and teaches courses on Museums and Education and Indigenous Curation.

  • Ben Garcia, Museum of Man, San Diego, CA

Ben Garcia (MS Ed.) is Deputy Director at the San Diego Museum of Man. He has worked for sixteen years in various roles as an arts educator, museum educator, exhibit developer, and administrator. His museum experience includes six years in the Education Department at the J. Paul Getty Museum, three years as Associate Director of Education at the Skirball Cultural Center, and three years as Head of Interpretation at the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology at UC Berkeley. He has presented and published on the museums as they relate to learning, public value, decolonization, undoing institutional racism, and social change. He is a steering committee member of Museums & Race and a member of the Advisory Board for the Adoption Museum Project.

 

Enjoy Your Weekend!

Peter Collings

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Interim Chair

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi All,

Some news from around the Department:

Center for Latin American Studies Director Search

Dr. Jan French is the first candidate for the position of Director of the Center for Latin American Studies to visit campus for two days of on-campus meetings. Dr. French will be visiting us next week, Wed April 3-Thurs April 4, and presenting on her scholarly work and research on Wednesday, April 3, 3:15-4:30 PM, in 219 Dauer Hall. This presentation is open to the public.

Please note that all candidates’ CVs and cover letters can be found here: http://fora.aa.ufl.edu/Provost/SearchCommittees/Director-Center-for-Latin-American-Studies—Search-Committee

Melvin Ember Internship at HRAF

HRAF’s one-year internship in Melvin Ember’s name is open for applicants until April 5th! The intent of the internship is to learn about cross-cultural research through practical experience. Some of the main tasks will be: 1) helping Carol Ember prepare modules summarizing cross-cultural research; 2) reading and analyzing recent cross-cultural research to summarize materials for the Explaining Human Culture database; and 3) participating in an on-going cross-cultural research project.

The internship will reimburse expenses in the amount of $400 per week for approximately 50 weeks beginning late June or early July of 2019.  More https://hraf.yale.edu/2019-hraf-internship-in-honor-of-melvin-ember/Information is here.

Upcoming Lectures

The Rise of China in Africa – See flyer for more details

Infrastructure, environment, and society: Critical geographies of socio-environmental relations across Latin America – See flyer for more details

 

Hi All,

Welcome back from a (hopefully) relaxing and refreshing spring break!  Here are some news and notes from around the Department:

Announcing some New Hires in Anthropology

I am pleased to welcome two new hires to our Department, who will join us in August:

Dr. Dan Contreras comes to us from the University of Maryland. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University. His research currently includes both field-based and modeling projects in which he examines landscape change and its relationship to long-term human occupation, looking at the ways in which humans have both adapted to and caused environmental changes.

Dr. Alix Johnson arrives at UF from the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of California, Berkeley. She earned her PhD at the University of California Santa Cruz in 2018.  She will drive from her previous position at Queen’s University in Canada. Her research examines expanding digital networks as a lens on questions of sovereignty, identity, and imperial power in the Arctic.

Please join me in extending a warm welcome to both of our new colleagues.

Armadillo Roast this Saturday!

Tomorrow is the Armadillo Roast and the weather is going to be close to perfect, if you define temperatures in the 70s as perfect. (Some us prefer it a bit … cooler.)

FASA is providing the meat (including a mysterious one), but please bring a side dish or dessert to share.  And bring your best attempt at a pie for the pie baking competition, we have categories for tempered, untempered and decorated pies.

If you are able to help with set-up or clean-up, please contact Hannah Toombs at toombshannah@ufl.edu.