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Assistant Professor
Office: B123
Phone:
Email: kimvalenta@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. University of Toronto
  • M.A. University of Calgary
  • B.A. McGill University

Research Interests

Plant-animal co-evolution, sensory ecology, evolutionary ecology, conservation, Madagascar


Personal Statement

I am an evolutionary ecologist researching the interactions between wild plants and animals and how these can be affected by human activities. My research is integrative and multi-disciplinary and combines field observations of animal foraging behavior in the tropics with diverse analytical techniques – including chemistry and spectroscopy – to quantify plant attractants and deterrents.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

Honors


Selected Publications

 

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught

Lecturer
Office: Turlington B137
Email: sbogart@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Iowa State University, 2009
  • M.A. Anthropology, Iowa State University, 2005
  • B.A. Anthropology, Miami University, 2003
  • B.A. Zoology, Miami University, 2003

Research Interests

Non-human primates, great apes, chimpanzees, behavioral ecology, diet, tool use, communication, cognition, sociality/reproduction, conservation, Senegal, human evolution, human behavior


Personal Statement

Dr. Bogart’s primary research focus is to understand how the environment influences behavior in correlation with evolution. Chimpanzees, human’s closest living relative, are the focus of her research. Dr. Bogart integrates interdisciplinary methods and themes from anthropology, behavioral ecology, biology, and neuroscience. She has conducted research with both captive and wild primates, including capuchin monkeys, gorillas, orangutans, bonobos, and chimpanzees. Research topics include behavioral ecology of chimpanzees, chimpanzee tool-use, great ape communication, sociality, and prosociality.

Dr. Bogart has collaborated on research carried out at Yerkes National Primate Center, MD Anderson Biomedical Research Center, and the Milwaukee and Jacksonville Zoos. She has conducted over 14 years of research in Senegal, West Africa at the Fongoli savanna chimpanzee site at Mt. Assirik Research Site (MARS) in the Niokola-Koba National Park.

Conservation efforts are prominent in research primates and Dr. Bogart’s main focus is on developing action plans to sustain the chimpanzee populations in Senegal. Efforts involve working closely with local government agencies.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

  • Assistant Professor of Teaching, Biological Sciences, Human and Evolutionary Biology, University of Southern California, 2018
  • Lecturer, Biological Sciences, Human and Evolutionary Biology, University of Southern California, 2014-2017
  • Assistant Professor, Anthropology, Lawrence University, 2013-2014
  • Postdoctoral Associate, Neuroscience Institute and the Language Research Center, Georgia State University, 2012-2013
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Agnes Scott College, 2010-2012
  • Visiting Lecturer, Anthropology, University of California San Diego, Spring 2010
  • Visiting Lecturer, Anthropology, Iowa State University, Spring 2008

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors


Selected Publications

Pruetz JD, Bogart SL, Lindshield SM. In Press. Savanna chimpanzees at Fongoli, Senegal, use tools to reconcile an extreme environment. Chapter for Chimpanzees in Context, In Press

Pruetz JD, Bogart SL, Lindshield SM, Walkup K. Feeding-related tool use in primates. In: Lambert JE & Rothman J, Eds. Primate Diet and Nutrition: Needing, Finding, and Using Food. In Press

Taglialatela JP, Russell JL, Pope SM, Morton T, Bogart S, Reamer LA, Schapiro SJ, Hopkins WD. 2015. Multimodal communication in chimpanzees. Am J Primatol 77: 1143-1148.

Leroy F, Cai Q, Bogart S, et al. 2015. A new human-specific brain landmark: The depth asymmetry of the superior temporal sulcus. PNAS 112 (4): 1208-1213.

Bogart, S. L., Bennett, A. J., Schapiro, S. J., Reamer, L. A., Hopkins, W. D. (2014). Different early rearing experiences have long-term effects on cortical organization in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Developmental Science. Vol. 17 (2), pp. 161-174.

Bogart, S. L., Pruetz, J. D., Ormiston, L. K., Russell, J. L., Meguerditchian, A., Hopkins, W. D. (2012). Termite fishing laterality in the Fongoli savanna chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus): Further evidence of a left hand preference. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. Vol. 149, pp. 591-598.

Bogart, S. L., Mangin, J., Schapiro, S. J., Reamer, L., Bennett, A. J., Pierre, P. J., Hopkins, W. D. (2012). Cortical sulci asymmetries in chimpanzees and macaques: A new look at an old idea. Neuroimage. Vol. 61 (3), pp. 533-541.

Bogart, S. L., Pruetz, J. D. (2011). Insectivory of Savanna Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) at Fongoli, Senegal. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. Vol. 145 (1), pp. 11-20.

Bogart, S. L., Pruetz, J. D. (2008). Ecological context of savanna chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) termite fishing at Fongoli, Senegal. American Journal of Primatology. Vol. 70 (6), pp. 605-612.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

National Science Foundation – High-Risk Research in Anthropology:
  • Key Personnel (50%),
  • Habituation Feasibility Assessment for Critically Endangered Pan troglodytes verus in a Savanna Environment at Parc National du Nioklo-Koba, Senegal
  • $34,967 (May 2017 – May 2018)
USC Women in Science and Engineering Supplemental Faculty Support
  • Principal Investigator (100%) – $5,000 (May-July 2017)
Primate Conservation, Inc.:
  • Co-PI (50%),
  • Disease transmission prevention between critically endangered western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and research agents at Mont Assirik in Parc National du Niokolo-Koba, Sénégal
  • $4,355 (May 2017 – May 2018)
The Leakey Foundation:
  • Principal Investigator (100%).
  • Savanna chimpanzee ecology at MARS (Mount Assirik Research Site).
  • $24,783 (May 2015 – Nov 2016)

Courses Taught

 

Photo of Hannah Toombs

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email:    toombshannah@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D.,
  • M.A.,
  • B.A.,

Subfield

Cultural Anthropology


Chair

Dr. Tucker


Research Interests

Materiality, Human-Environmental Interaction, the Impact of NGO’s on community life, Women and Development, Gender, Heritage Tourism and Conservation, Indigenous Knowledge and Tradition, Environmental Governance, Visual Anthropology and Ethnographic Film, Latin America, Honduras


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

Professor
Office: Grinter Hall 309
Phone: (352) 392-0690
Email: tuckerc@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Arizona, 1996
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1987
  • B.A., Interdisciplinary Major in Anthropology/Biology/Philosophy, Gustavus Adolphus College,1983

Research Interests

Economic and environmental anthropology, environmental governance, community-based conservation, institutional analysis, climate change adaptation, coffee production & consumption, value chains, belief systems, sustainability


Personal Statement

My research explores human-environment interactions through a transdisciplinary approach encompassing environmental and economic anthropology, political ecology, institutional analysis, and participatory approaches. For the most part, I focus on the Latin American experience, including community-based forest and water management, coffee production and value chains, interactions between people and protected areas, governance of common-pool resources, adaptation to climate change, sustainability, globalization, and belief systems.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

  • 2017-Present Professor, Department of Anthropology & Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • 2015 -17 Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology & Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • 2015 -Present Affiliated Faculty, Tropical Conservation and Development Program, University of Florida
  • 2012 -15 Chair, Department of Anthropology, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • 2009 -15 Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Indiana U, Bloomington
  • 2003-09 Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, Indiana U, Bloomington
  • 2004 – Present Affiliated Faculty, Vincent & Elinor Ostrom Workshop in Political Theory & Policy Analysis, Indiana U, Bloomington
  • 2003-15 Associated Faculty, Center for the Study of Institutions, Population, and Environmental Change (CIPEC), Indiana U, Bloomington

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

Memberships
  • American Anthropological Association
  • International Association for the Study of the Commons
  • Society for Applied Anthropology
Other Experiences
  • Elected council member, International Association for the Study of the Commons (2017- present)
  • Scientific Advisory Council, Mountain Research Initiative (2014-present)
  • Associate Editor, Society and Conservation (2010 – Present)
  • Editorial Board, Human Ecology (2015-present)

Honors

  • 2014 Featured Scholar, Global Learning Center, University of Illinois, Chicago
  • 2013 Fellow, Academic Leadership Seminar, Committee on Institutional Cooperation (Consortium of “Big Ten” Conference Universities and affiliates)
  • 2011 Sustainability Course Development Fellowship, “Ecology and Society.” Indiana University
  • 2010 Collaborative Research and Creative Activity Summer Stipend Award, Office of the Vice Provost for Research, Indiana University
  • 2009 Trustees’ Teaching Award, Indiana University
  • 2008 Fellow, Society for Applied Anthropology (SfAA), United States
  • 2007 Outstanding Session Prize for “Natural resource management, science and spirituality: Intersections shaping Latin America’s environment.” School for Advanced Research and the Latin American Studies Association
  • 2007 Research Fellowship, College of Arts and Humanities Institute, Indiana University
  • 2006 Summer Faculty Fellowship, “Indigenous Institutions, Collective Action and the Conservation of Biodiversity in Oaxaca, Mexico,” Indiana University
  • 1992-93 Graduate Registration Scholarship, University of Arizona, Tucson
  • 1990-91 Graduate College Fellowship, University of Arizona, Tucson
  • 1983 Phi Beta Kappa

Selected Publications

Books

Tucker, C. M. 2017. Coffee Culture: Local Experiences, Global Connections. Second Edition. New York: Routledge Press.

Tucker, C. M., ed. 2012. Nature, Science and Religion: Intersections shaping society and the environment. Santa Fe, NM: School for Advanced Research (SAR) Press.

Tucker, C. M. 2008. Changing Forests: Collective Action, Common Property and Coffee in Honduras. New York: Springer Academic Press.

Representative Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

Muhar, A., C. Raymond, R. van den Born, N. Bauer, K. Böck, M. Braito, A. Buljs, C. Flint, W. de Groot, C. Ives, T. Mitrofanenko, T. Plieninger, C. Tucker, C. van Riper. 2017. A Model Integrating Social-Cultural Concepts of Nature into Frameworks of Interaction between Social and Natural Systems. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management. DOI: 10.1080/09640568.2017.1327424

Upton, C., C. Tucker, S. Sanchez. 2017. The Dominican Republic-Central American Free Trade Agreement’s Symbolic Nod to Environmental Protection: Legal Perspectives on CAFTA’s Citizen Submission Process. Society and Natural Resources. URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08941920.2017.1290183

Tucker, C. M. 2014. Creating equitable water institutions on disputed land: A Honduran case study. Water International 39(2):216-232.

Eakin, H., C. M. Tucker, E. Castellanos, R. Diaz-Porras, J. F. Barrera, H. Morales. 2014. Adaptation in a Multi-stressor Environment: Perceptions and responses to climatic and economic risks by coffee growers in Mesoamerica. Environment, Development and Sustainability 16(1):123-139. URL: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10668-013-9466-9

Castellanos, E., C. Tucker, H. Eakin, H. Morales, J. Barrera and R. Diaz. 2013. Assessing the Adaptation Strategies of Farmers Facing Multiple Stressors: Lessons from the Coffee and Global Changes Project in Mesoamerica. Environmental Science and Policy 26:19-28. URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1462901112000974

Tucker, C. M. 2010. Private Goods and Common Property: Pottery Production in a Honduran Lenca Community. Human Organization 69(1):43-53.

Tucker, C. M. 2010. Learning on Governance in Forest Ecosystems: Lessons from Recent Research. International Journal of the Commons 4(2):687-706. URL: http://www.thecommonsjournal.org/index.php/ijc/article/view/224/170

Tucker, C. M., H. Eakin, and E. Castellanos. 2010. Perceptions of Risk and Adaptation: Coffee producers, market shocks and extreme weather in Central America and Mexico. Global Environmental Change 20:23-32. Published online August 2009. URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378009000478

Tucker, C. M., J. C. Randolph, T. Evans, K. P. Andersson, L. Persha, and G. M. Green. 2008. An approach to assess relative degradation in dissimilar forests: toward a comparative assessment of institutional outcomes. Ecology and Society 13(1): 4. [online] URL: http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol13/iss1/art4/Insight

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

National Park Service, “Ethnobotany and Traditional Ecological Knowledge for Badlands National Park, South Dakota.” Principal Investigator with C. Sage, Co-PI]. 2016-18.

National Science Foundation Research Coordination Network Grant, “Bridging Communities and Scales through a Global Transdisciplinary Mountain Sustainability Network.” [Co-PI with J. Klein (Principal Investigator, Colorado State U), A. Nolin (Oregon State U) and R. Reid (Colorado State U)] 2014-2019

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Inter-American Institute (IAI) Collaborative Research Network Program Grant (IAI-CRN 2060), “Small Coffee Producers and Adaptive Options for a Changing Climate: The Risks and Challenges of Certification for Ecosystem Services.” [Co-PI with E. Castellanos (Principal Investigator , Universidad del Valle de Guatemala), H. Eakin (ASU, Tempe), J. Barrera (ECOSUR, Mexico) and R. Díaz (Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica)] 2012-2015

Courses Taught

 

UF Research Foundation Professor, Anthropology and Tropical Conservation and Development Program
Office: Grinter Hall, Room 337
Phone: (352) 392-0299
Lab: Turlington Hall, Room B375
Email: stepp@ufl.edu
Website
Google Scholar


Education

  • Ph.D.
  • M.A.
  • B.A.

Research Interests

Cultural ecology, ecological anthropology, ethnobotany, medical anthropology, visual anthropology, Mesoamerica


Personal Statement

Rick (John Richard) Stepp is UF Research Foundation Professor of Anthropology at the University of Florida. He is a core faculty member of the Tropical Conservation and Development Program and the Land Use and Environmental Change Institute. He is also an affiliate faculty member of the School of Natural Resources and Environment and several other interdisciplinary centers focused on environmental research. He has conducted conservation research over the last two decades throughout the tropics, especially in the Maya Forest and in the Greater Mekong Region of Southeast Asia. His research explores persistence, change and variation of traditional ecological knowledge and ethnobiology. Much of this work has focused on wild food plants and medicinal plants. His work has also focused on patterns and causes in the distribution of biological and cultural diversity (biocultural diversity). He is leading the Quest 3 experiential learning initiative at UF and also serves as online coordinator for the Department of Anthropology. He is an associate editor for several journals in environmental anthropology and ethnobiology. He is past-president of the Society for Economic Botany and current president of the International Society of Ethnobiology.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

Honors

 


Selected Publications

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Courses Taught