Photo of Kelly Chapman

Alumni

Email: kschapman@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Florida
  • M.P.H., Public Health, Epidemiology, University of Florida, 2016
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2015
  • B.A., Biological Anthropology, University of Texas, 2012

Subfield

Cultural Anthropology

Medical Anthropology


Chair

Dr. Pete Collings


Research Interests

Kelly is an applied biocultural anthropologist with an interest in global health, perceptions of health and disease, gender inequality, psychosocial stress, and structural violence. Much of her research emphasizes using anthropological methods to strengthen evidence-based approaches in global health and development. Her PhD research explored the cultural perceptions surrounding water use and vaginal health in the Ouest region of Haiti.

Haiti, Women’s Health, Health Beliefs, Water, Cultural Perceptions


Selected Publications

Chapman, K. S., Wood, E. A., McKune, S. L., & Madsen Beau De Rochars, V. E. (2017). Common Beliefs
around Vaginal Illness and Water Quality in Haiti.
Air & Water Borne Diseases, 6(2).


Wood, E. A.,
Chapman, K. S., McKune, S. L., & Madsen Beau De Rochars, V. E. (2017). Community-based
Health Needs Assessment in Léogâne and Gressier, Haiti: Six Years Post-Earthquake.
Journal of International
Humanitarian Action, 2
(9).

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

  • Graduate School Doctoral Dissertation Award, University of Florida, 2019
  • Research Abroad for Doctoral Students (RAD) Award, University of Florida International Center, 2017
  • Exemplary Student Award, College of Public Health and Health Professions 2016-2017
  • Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship Recipient, Intensive summer program in Haitian Creole 2017
  • National Science Foundation: Graduate Research Fellowship, Honorable Mention 2013-2014
  • Ruegamer Scholarship, Biochemistry Scholarship, granted in 2013
  • American Business Woman’s Association Scholarship, Scholarship, granted in 2009

This student has graduated from the program so the information on this page may not be current.

 Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr.   

Visiting SEC Scholar

My Soul Is in Haiti: An Anthropologist’s Study of Protestant Culture, 

Thursday, February 18, 3:00 pm Pugh 150

Historically, the majority of Haitians have long practiced Catholicism or Vodou. However, Protestant forms of Christianity now flourish both in Haiti and beyond. In the Bahamas, where approximately one in five people are now Haitian-born or Haitian-descended, Protestantism has become the majority religion for immigrant Haitians.

 In his talk about In his new book My Soul Is in Haiti: Protestantism in the Haitian Diaspora of the Bahamas (New York University Press 2015), Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr., Vice Chair of Africana Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at The University of Tennessee, will discuss the research he conducted in the United States, Haiti, and the Bahamas that led to the publication of this ground-breaking text. Specifically, he will analyze why Protestantism has appealed to the Haitian diaspora community in the Bahamas. His talk will also illustrate how devout Haitian Protestant migrants in the Bahamas use their religious identities to ground themselves in a place that is hostile to them as migrants.  The presentation also uncovers how their religious faith ties in to their belief in the need to “save” their homeland, as they re-imagine Haiti politically and morally as a Protestant Christian nation.

 

Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr. is Vice Chair of Africana Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), a 2015 UTK Quest Scholar of the week, a 2016 and a 2013 Southeastern Conference (SEC) Travel Grant Award recipient and a 2012 American Anthropological Association (AAA) Leadership Fellow. 

 Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr.   

Visiting SEC Scholar

My Soul Is in Haiti: An Anthropologist’s Study of Protestant Culture, 

Thursday, February 18, 3:00 pm Pugh 150

Historically, the majority of Haitians have long practiced Catholicism or Vodou. However, Protestant forms of Christianity now flourish both in Haiti and beyond. In the Bahamas, where approximately one in five people are now Haitian-born or Haitian-descended, Protestantism has become the majority religion for immigrant Haitians.

 In his talk about In his new book My Soul Is in Haiti: Protestantism in the Haitian Diaspora of the Bahamas (New York University Press 2015), Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr., Vice Chair of Africana Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at The University of Tennessee, will discuss the research he conducted in the United States, Haiti, and the Bahamas that led to the publication of this ground-breaking text. Specifically, he will analyze why Protestantism has appealed to the Haitian diaspora community in the Bahamas. His talk will also illustrate how devout Haitian Protestant migrants in the Bahamas use their religious identities to ground themselves in a place that is hostile to them as migrants.  The presentation also uncovers how their religious faith ties in to their belief in the need to “save” their homeland, as they re-imagine Haiti politically and morally as a Protestant Christian nation.

 

Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr. is Vice Chair of Africana Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), a 2015 UTK Quest Scholar of the week, a 2016 and a 2013 Southeastern Conference (SEC) Travel Grant Award recipient and a 2012 American Anthropological Association (AAA) Leadership Fellow. 

Gerald Murray, Ph.D.

Title : Professor Emeritus

Interests : Applied anthropology, anthropology of religion, linguistics, agroforestry, Caribbean and Latin America, Israel and Palestine

Programs : Cultural Anthropology

Personal Statement
I have done extended fieldwork in Haiti and the Dominican Republic , and have done applied contract assignments in 15 countries for 27 public and private agencies. I designed and directed an agroforestry project in Haiti that during a 20 year period facilitated trees to over a quarter of a million farm families. Recent applied research assignments include child slavery in Haiti and the D.R., potential conflicts surrounding planned dam construction that would flood out farming communities near the Panama Canal, and a month of fieldwork on the Gaza Strip among Hebrew-speaking farmers being shelled by Hamas and Islamic Jihad in the turbulent weeks immediately preceding their planned expulsion and involuntary relocation by the Israeli government. I have written three books, 27 articles and book chapters, and 59 applied anthropological reports. I have studied fifteen languages (some extinct) and have interviewed and/or conversed in eight. My Ph.D. students, a heterogeneous crowd of stellar human beings, have done research in Haiti , the Dominican Republic , Barbados , Brazil , Zimbabwe , the Philippines , and the U.S. with a variety of NSF and Wenner-Gren funds.

In my view Cultural Anthropology at its best entails three logically sequenced intellectual operations: (1) fieldwork-based documentation; (2) cross-cultural comparison-and-contrast; (3) the search for causal explanations or interpretation within one or more intellectual paradigms. Fieldwork ideally entails both descriptive and quantitative methods. And it should be sensitive to the shifting, tentative, evolving character of any human system. Explanations are often hypothetical and “hard to prove”. But in my view a major mission of anthropology is the identification of the powerful causal forces which, often unbeknownst to the human actors themselves, govern the evolution of cultures and of individual human lives.

Applied Cultural Anthropology builds on these three operations but adds the assumptions that (1) not all human systems are functioning optimally – as seen in conditions of poverty, violence, slavery, environmental destruction; (2) systemic malfunctions and human suffering and abuse are due to a combination of identifiable internal and external factors; (3) these negative factors can often be either neutralized or at least mitigated with intelligent analysis and planning. Often. Not always. In some settings Anthropology entails the documentation of human ingenuity and creativity; in others it may entail the documentation of human stupidity and malice. Most human cultures, and most human lives, probably entail a sui generis combination of both tendencies.

Office
Grinter Hall, Room 331
PO 117305
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-7305

Phone Number : 352-392 3830 x302

Email: murray@ufl.edu

Webpage : http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/murray