Photo of Justin Dunnavant

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: jdunnavant@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Florida (in progress)
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2013
  • B.A., Anthropology and History, Howard University, 2009

Subfield

Archaeology


Chair

Dr. Brandt


Research Interests

Historical Archaeology of Africa and the African Diaspora, Postcolonial Theory, World Systems, Atlantic and Indian Ocean Slave Trade, Representation and Identity, Oral History, African American History, Ethnoarchaeology, Maritime Landscapes


Selected Publications

Dunnavant, Justin. In Press Access Denied: African Americans and Access to End-of-Life Care in Nineteenth Century Washington, D.C. Historical Archaeology 51(1).

Dunnavant, Justin. 2014  Excavating a Pioneer from the Archives: William Leo Hansberry and African Archaeology. The Archive Issue. Archaeological Review from Cambridge (29)2: 34-49.

King, Eleanor and Justin Dunnavant. 2008  Buffalo Soldiers and Apaches in the Guadalupe Mountains: A Review of Research at Pine Springs Camp. Bulletin of the Texas Archaeological Society 78: 87-94.

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

  • Vanderbilt Academic Pathways Postdoctoral Fellowship, Fall 2018 – Spring 2020
  • University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship, Fall 2017 – Spring 2018
  • Graduate School Doctoral Research Travel Award, Summer 2016
  • Charles H. Fairbanks Fellowship, Summer 2016
  • Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship, Fall 2014 – Spring 2017
  • Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship, Amharic, Fall 2013 – Spring 2014
  • Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship, Amharic, Summer 2013
  • McKnight Doctoral Fellowship, Fall 2011 – Spring 2016
  • Grinter Fellowship, Fall 2010 – Fall 2012
  • Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship, Swahili, Fall 2010 – Spring 2011
  • Board of Education Summer Fellowship, Summer 2010
  • Fulbright US Scholars Program, Jamaica, Fall 2009 – Summer 2010

Photo of Mia Carey

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: m.carey17@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D.,
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2014
  • B.A.,

Subfield

Archaeology


Chair

Dr. deFrance


Research Interests

Historical Archaeology, Zooarchaeology, African American Diaspora, Environment, Health


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

 Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr.   

Visiting SEC Scholar

My Soul Is in Haiti: An Anthropologist’s Study of Protestant Culture, 

Thursday, February 18, 3:00 pm Pugh 150

Historically, the majority of Haitians have long practiced Catholicism or Vodou. However, Protestant forms of Christianity now flourish both in Haiti and beyond. In the Bahamas, where approximately one in five people are now Haitian-born or Haitian-descended, Protestantism has become the majority religion for immigrant Haitians.

 In his talk about In his new book My Soul Is in Haiti: Protestantism in the Haitian Diaspora of the Bahamas (New York University Press 2015), Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr., Vice Chair of Africana Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at The University of Tennessee, will discuss the research he conducted in the United States, Haiti, and the Bahamas that led to the publication of this ground-breaking text. Specifically, he will analyze why Protestantism has appealed to the Haitian diaspora community in the Bahamas. His talk will also illustrate how devout Haitian Protestant migrants in the Bahamas use their religious identities to ground themselves in a place that is hostile to them as migrants.  The presentation also uncovers how their religious faith ties in to their belief in the need to “save” their homeland, as they re-imagine Haiti politically and morally as a Protestant Christian nation.

 

Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr. is Vice Chair of Africana Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), a 2015 UTK Quest Scholar of the week, a 2016 and a 2013 Southeastern Conference (SEC) Travel Grant Award recipient and a 2012 American Anthropological Association (AAA) Leadership Fellow. 

 Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr.   

Visiting SEC Scholar

My Soul Is in Haiti: An Anthropologist’s Study of Protestant Culture, 

Thursday, February 18, 3:00 pm Pugh 150

Historically, the majority of Haitians have long practiced Catholicism or Vodou. However, Protestant forms of Christianity now flourish both in Haiti and beyond. In the Bahamas, where approximately one in five people are now Haitian-born or Haitian-descended, Protestantism has become the majority religion for immigrant Haitians.

 In his talk about In his new book My Soul Is in Haiti: Protestantism in the Haitian Diaspora of the Bahamas (New York University Press 2015), Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr., Vice Chair of Africana Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at The University of Tennessee, will discuss the research he conducted in the United States, Haiti, and the Bahamas that led to the publication of this ground-breaking text. Specifically, he will analyze why Protestantism has appealed to the Haitian diaspora community in the Bahamas. His talk will also illustrate how devout Haitian Protestant migrants in the Bahamas use their religious identities to ground themselves in a place that is hostile to them as migrants.  The presentation also uncovers how their religious faith ties in to their belief in the need to “save” their homeland, as they re-imagine Haiti politically and morally as a Protestant Christian nation.

 

Dr. Bertin M. Louis, Jr. is Vice Chair of Africana Studies and Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), a 2015 UTK Quest Scholar of the week, a 2016 and a 2013 Southeastern Conference (SEC) Travel Grant Award recipient and a 2012 American Anthropological Association (AAA) Leadership Fellow.