Photo of Mia Carey

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: m.carey17@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D.,
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2014
  • B.A.,

Subfield

Archaeology


Chair

Dr. deFrance


Research Interests

Historical Archaeology, Zooarchaeology, African American Diaspora, Environment, Health


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

Associate Professor and Department Chair, Department of Anthropology

Office: Turlington Hall, B135
Phone: (352) 294-7593
Email: pcollings@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Penn State University, 1999
  • M.A., University of Arkansas, 1994
  • B.A., Bowdoin College, 1990

Research Interests

Cultural anthropology, human development, human ecology, hunting and gathering societies, Canadian Arctic, contemporary Inuit peoples


Personal Statement

Dr. Collings’ research focuses on the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic. Though his research interests are varied, they revolve around two central themes, human development and human ecology.

The human development dimension draws on traditions in psychological anthropology and the anthropology of aging, and addresses the influence of historical time, social change and economic success on different age cohorts, on the structure of the Inuit life course, and on Inuit conceptions of successful aging.

The human ecology dimension of his research addresses the economics of contemporary subsistence, the influence of externally imposed regulations on foraging activities, change and continuity in food sharing practices within the context of climate change, and, most recently, the relationships between food insecurity and health and mental health.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

Honors


Selected Publications

Collings, Peter, Meredith G. Marten, Tristan Pearce, and Alyson Young. 2016. Food Insecurity, Sharing Networks, and Female-Headed Households in Arctic Canada. Ecology of Food and Nutrition 55(1):30-49.

Collings, Peter. 2014. Becoming Inummarik: Men’s Lives in an Inuit Community. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Collings, Peter. 2011. Economic Strategies, Community, and Food Networks in Ulukhaktok, NT, Canada. Arctic. 64(2):207-219.

Collings, Peter. 2009a. Birth Order, Age, and Hunting Success in the Canadian Arctic. Human Nature 20(4):254-274.

Collings, Peter. 2009b. Participant Observation, Phased Assertion, and Fieldwork with Inuit. Field Methods 21(2): 133-153.

Collings, Peter. 2005. Housing Policy, Aging, and Life Course Construction in a Canadian Inuit Community. Arctic Anthropology 42(2):50-65.

Collings, Peter. 2001. “If You Got Everything, It’s Good Enough:” Inuit Perspectives on Successful Aging. Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 16:127-155.

Collings, Peter. 2000. Aging and Life Course Development in an Inuit Community. Arctic Anthropology 37(2):111-125.

Collings, Peter, George Wenzel, and Richard G. Condon. 1998. Modern Food Sharing Networks and Community Integration in the Central Canadian Arctic. Arctic 51(4):301-314.

Condon, Richard G., Peter Collings, and George Wenzel. 1995. The Best Part of Life: Subsistence Hunting, Ethnic Identity, and Economic Adaptation among Young Adult Inuit Males. Arctic 48:31-46.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Courses Taught

 

deFrance
Professor
Office: Turlington Hall, Room B1350
Office Phone: (352) 294-7541
Lab: Turlington Hall, Room B117
Email: sdef@ufl.edu
Website

Education

  • Ph.D.
  • M.A.
  • B.A.

Research Interests

Zooarchaeology, Andes


Personal Statement

My research focus is historical and prehistoric zooarchaeology. I have conducted research in the Southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and the Central Andes. My research is interdisciplinary in focus with an emphasis on both the dietary and the environmental realms. Research and education in anthropology should include an understanding of how and why humans used animal resources through time. Not only were animals important for dietary or subsistence needs but animals are often imbued with ritual significance. Furthermore, faunal remains are often excellent proxy data for past environmental conditions. I also use zooarchaeology as a bridge to cultural studies in the origin and maintenance of traditional foodways and cuisine.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Selected Publications

2016 Origin of pre-Columbian guinea pigs from Caribbean archeological sites revealed through genetic analysis.  B. Kimura et al. Journal of Archaeological Science Reports 5:442–452. Kimura et al. aDNA guinea pigs JASReports

2014 Guinea Pigs in the Pre-Columbian West Indies, M. J. LeFebvre and Susan D. deFrance, Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 9:1, 16-44.  article pdf 

2013 Late Prehispanic Coquina Quarrying and Tomb Construction in Coastal Southern Peru. S. D. deFrance and Elizabeth Olson, Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 8(1):1-14. sdef and Olson JICA

2012 Fauna Local e Importada: Dieta y Uso de Animales en el Potosí Colonial Chungará (Chile) 44(1):9-24.  Chungara pdf

2011 Isotopic Evidence for Middle Horizon to Sixteenth Century Camelid Herding in the Osmore Valley, Peru. Erin Kennedy Thornton, Susan D. deFrance, John Krigbaum, and Patrick Ryan Williams, International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 21: 544–567.

2010 Paleopathology and Health of Native and Introduced Animals on Southern Peruvian and Bolivian Spanish Colonial Sites. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 20(5): 508-524.   article pdf

2009 Documenting 12,000 Years of Coastal Occupation on the Osmore Littoral, Peru, Susan D. deFrance, Nicci Grayson, and Karen Wise, Journal of Field Archaeology 34(3):227-246.  article pdf

2009 Zooarchaeology in Complex Societies: Political Economy, Status, and Ideology, Journal of Archaeological Research. Volume 17, Number 2 / June, 2009 DOI10.1007/s10814-008-9027-1 Pages 105-168.  article pdf

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UF Research Foundation Professor, Anthropology and Tropical Conservation and Development Program
Office: Grinter Hall, Room 337
Phone: (352) 392-0299
Lab: Turlington Hall, Room B375
Email: stepp@ufl.edu
Website
Google Scholar


Education

  • Ph.D.
  • M.A.
  • B.A.

Research Interests

Cultural ecology, ecological anthropology, ethnobotany, medical anthropology, visual anthropology, Mesoamerica


Personal Statement

Rick (John Richard) Stepp is UF Research Foundation Professor of Anthropology at the University of Florida. He is a core faculty member of the Tropical Conservation and Development Program and the Land Use and Environmental Change Institute. He is also an affiliate faculty member of the School of Natural Resources and Environment and several other interdisciplinary centers focused on environmental research. He has conducted conservation research over the last two decades throughout the tropics, especially in the Maya Forest and in the Greater Mekong Region of Southeast Asia. His research explores persistence, change and variation of traditional ecological knowledge and ethnobiology. Much of this work has focused on wild food plants and medicinal plants. His work has also focused on patterns and causes in the distribution of biological and cultural diversity (biocultural diversity). He is leading the Quest 3 experiential learning initiative at UF and also serves as online coordinator for the Department of Anthropology. He is an associate editor for several journals in environmental anthropology and ethnobiology. He is past-president of the Society for Economic Botany and current president of the International Society of Ethnobiology.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

Honors

 


Selected Publications

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Courses Taught

Dr. Michael Warren

Associate Professor

Email: mwarren@ufl.edu
Pound Lab

Education

  • Ph.D.
  • M.A.
  • B.A.

Research Interests

Warren’s areas of interest include forensic identification and trauma analysis, human variation, and the relationship between the environment and body form. His current project is a collaborative effort with Dr. David Daegling, examining the mechanism of trauma in rib and mandibular fractures. Warren recently co-authored an introductory textbook on forensic anthropology. As both a UF graduate student and faculty member, Warren has been contributing to the Pound Lab’s casework since 1991. He has also assisted with personal identification in mass disasters, and helped to identify, and document war crimes against, the victims of genocide in Bosnia, Serbia and Kosovo.


Selected Publications

Van Deest, Traci L., Michael W. Warren, and Katelyn L. Bolhofner. 2012. Advances in the Anthropological Analysis of Cremated Remains. In A Companion to Forensic Anthropology, edited by Dennis Dirkmaat, pp. 418-431. Wiley-Blackwell, Malden, MA.

Warren, Michael W., Traci Van Deest, and Kristina Ballard. 2011. Quality Assurance as Pedagogy for Academic Forensic Anthropology Laboratories. Forensic Science Policy & Management 2(2):70-74.

Warren, Michael W., Heather A. Walsh-Haney, and Laurel Freas, eds. 2008. The Forensic Anthropology Laboratory. CRC Press, Boca Raton.

Daegling, David J., Michael W. Warren, Jennifer L. Hotzman, and Casey J. Self. 2008. Structural Analysis of Human Rib Fracture and Implications for Forensic Interpretation. Journal of Forensic Sciences 53(6):1301-1307.


Courses

Advanced Techniques in Forensic Anthropology (ANG 6740)
Human Osteology and Osteometry (ANG 5525)
Human Osteology (ANT 4525)
Skeleton Keys: Forensic Identification (ANT 3520)

Professor Emerita, Department of Anthropology

Affiliate Faculty, Center for African Studies, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Women’s Studies & Gender Research, and School of Natural Resources & Environment

UF Mailing Address: 1112 Turlington, PO Box 117305, Gainesville FL 32611-7305

Phone: (352) 376-4833

Cell: (352) 256-1163

Email: aspring@ufl.edu or springanita@yahoo.com

Mailing Address for Correspondence: 5707 SW 17th Drive, Gainesville FL 32608

 

Research Interests

International Agricultural Development; Food Security and Food Sovereignty; Entrepreneurship: Micro-enterprises to Global Business in Africa; Women/Gender in International Development; Women, Agriculture and Land, Environment and Resource Management; Chinese in Africa; Applied Cultural Anthropology; Extensive International Experience


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

University of Florida

2015-present: Co-Director China-in-Africa Working Group

2010-2014: Director: Sub-Saharan Business Environment Project

2009-present: Retired, Professor Emerita, University of Florida

1993-present: Professor

1985-1988: Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Oversight of international programs (oversight of African Studies, Asian Studies, Jewish Studies, Greek Studies, etc.), interdisciplinary programs (oversight of Women’s Studies, Gerontology, etc.); academic overseas student programs; undergraduate and graduate curriculum, affirmative action

1984-1986: Director, Women in Agricultural Development Program. Speakers’ series, Bibliographic database, curricular activities, International conference on Gender Issues and Farming Systems Research, fund raising

1979-1981, 1983-1984, 1993-1994: Associate Chair, Department of Anthropology

1979: Director, Summer Institute on African Studies for Teachers and Educators

1978-1992: Associate Professor, Dept. of Anthropology and African Studies

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

1988-1991: Chief, Women in Agricultural Production and Rural Development Service. Oversight of FAO’s global operation on women in development, supervision of projects and design of major policy documents. Policy advice to Member Governments, training on Gender Analysis (over 700 senior officers of the FAO trained); women and the environment; development of statistical indicators and database on gender and development; formulation and backstopping of field projects; home economics programs; population and WID; raising funds for projects by working with donors and other United Nations agencies.  (LEVEL: D-1)

USAID/Office of Women in Development

1981-1983: Chief of Party, Women in Agricultural Development Project in Malawi (WIADP), a national project. Oversight of farming systems research, extension and institution building components carried out through the Ministry of Agriculture. In 1985, the WIADP was evaluated as the best project that USAID had carried out for the inclusion of women in its agricultural projects in the decade for women, and was the subject of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Report on Science radio broadcast in 1983.

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

Quality Control Chemist, Oxford Chemical Company, Atlanta GA

Museum Curator: Museum of Anthropology, San Francisco State University

President: Culture and Agriculture, American Anthropological Association, 2009-2011

President Assoc. for Africanist Anthropology, American Anthropological Association, 2012-2016

 


Selected Publications

Books

Spring, Anita, Robert Rolfe, and Levy Odera. Sub-Saharan Business Environment 2012-2013. Gainesville, FL CIBER: 2014.

Spring, Anita, Robert Rolfe, and Gregory Parent. Sub-Saharan Business Environment 2011. Gainesville, FL CIBER: 2012.

Nelson Santos António, Virgínia Trigo, Anita Spring et. al. China and Portuguese Speaking Africa: Business Approaches and Management Models in China, Mozambique and Cape Verde. Lisbon: Ed. Silabo. 2011.

Spring, Anita. ed. Women Farmers and Commercial Ventures: Increasing Food Security in Developing Countries. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers. 417 pp., 2000.

Spring, Anita and Barbara McDade, eds. African Entrepreneurship: Theory and Reality. University Press of Florida. 331 pp. 1998.

Steven Brandt, Anita Spring, et al. The Tree Against Hunger: Enset-Based Agricultural Systems in Ethiopia. Washington DC: American Association for the Advancement of Science. 1997.

Spring, Anita. Agricultural Development and Gender Issues in Malawi. Lanham, and London: University Press of America. 316 pp. 1995.

Poats, Susan, Marianne Schmink, and Anita Spring, eds. Gender Issues and Farming Systems Research and Extension. Boulder and London: Westview Press. 450 pp. 1988.

Gallin, Rita and Anita Spring, eds. Women Creating Wealth: Transforming Economic Development. Washington, DC Association for Women in Development. 185 pp. 1985.

Articles

Spring, Anita and Kimberly Swallow. “Feed the Future Learning Agenda Literature Review: Improved Gender Integration and Women’s Empowerment.” USAID. 2015.

Spring, Anita. The Entrepreneurial Landscape for African Women. In Anne Coles, Leslie Gray, and Janet Momsen, eds. The Routledge Handbook of Gender and Development, London and New York: Routledge. 2015. pp. 465-478.

Spring, Anita and Lettice Kinunda Rutashobya. Women Entrepreneurs Drive Prosperity: What Hinders Them? Legatum Prosperity Report 2014. pp. 23-26.

Spring, Anita, Robert Rolfe, and Levy Odera. The Sub-Saharan Africa Business Environment, 2012-2013: Development and Sustainability in Africa Business. In P.D. Rwelamila and Anita Spring, eds. Proceedings of the International Academy of African Business & Development, 2014.

Lal, Rattan Anita Spring, and Ross Welsh. Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) External Evaluation Phase IV (2009-2014). USAID/Bureau of Food Security. 2013. pp. 134.

Spring, Anita. Africa’s 2012-13 Findings: The Sub-Saharan Business Environment. In E. Obuah, ed. Proceedings of the International Academy of African Business & Development, 2013.

Spring, Anita and Yang Jiao. Transnational Migration and the Business Environment of the Chinese in Ghana. In E. Obuah, ed. Proceedings of the International Academy of African Business & Development, 2013.

Spring, Anita. Africa’s Open for Business: The Sub-Saharan Business Environment, 2011 Findings. In E. Obuah, ed. Proceedings of the International Academy of African Business & Development, 2012. pp.197-207.

Ndhlovu, Tidings and Spring, Anita. The Hopeful Continent: Economic Development and the Rise of Sub-Saharan Africa’s Performance. In E. Obuah, editor, Proceedings of the International Academy of African Business & Development, 2012. pp. 89-99.

Spring, Anita. The Sub-Saharan Business Environment Report: Business Information at a Ready Glance. In E. Obuah, editor, Challenges in the Era of Globalization Proceedings of the International Academy of African Business & Development. pp.370-376. 2011.

Spring, Anita. Chinese Development Aid and Agribusiness in Africa. Proceedings of the International Academy of African Business & Development. pp.1-12. 2009.

Spring, Anita, and Lettice Kinunda Rutashobya, eds. Special Issue: Gender and Entrepreneurship in Africa. Journal of African Business. Vol. 10. N0. 1, 2009.

Spring, Anita. Empowering Women in the African Entrepreneurial Landscape. In M. Ndulo, ed. Power, Gender and Social Change in Africa. New Castle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 293-326. 2009.

Spring, Anita. African Women in the Entrepreneurial Landscape: Reconsidering the Formal and Informal Sectors. Journal of African Business. 10: 1: 11-30. 2009.

Ndhlovu, Tiding and Anita Spring. South African Women in Business and Management. Journal of African Business. 10: 1: 31-49. 2009.

Spring, Anita. The West African Enterprise Network: Business Globalists, Interregional Trade and U.S. Interventions. In A. Jalloh and T. Falola, eds. The United States and West Africa: Interactions and Relations. University of Rochester Press. Pp. 305-324. 2008.

Spring, Anita and Robert Rugimbana. Microfinance and Microsavings for African Women. International Journal of Non-profit and Voluntary Sector Marketing. 14:1-7, 2008.

Spring, Anita. African Women in the Entrepreneurial Landscape: Reconsidering the Formal and Informal Sectors. Cadernos de Estudos Africanos No. 9:6:56-72. 2008.

Spring, Anita and Yang Jiao. China in Africa: African Views of Chinese Investments and Entrepreneurship. Proceedings of the International Academy of African Business & Development. 2008, Pp. 55-64. 2008.

McDade, Barbara and Anita Spring. “The New Generation of African Entrepreneurs: Changing the Environment for Business Development and Economic Growth.” Entrepreneurship and Regional Development 17:1:1-26. 2005.

Spring, Anita. “Gender and the Range of Entrepreneurial Strategies: The Typical and the New African Woman Entrepreneur.” In A. Jalloh and T. Falola, eds. Black Business and Economic Power. Rochester: University of Rochester Press. pp. 381-401. 2002. Reprinted 2008. In Janet Momsen, ed. Gender and Development: Critical Concepts. Oxford: Routledge.

Spring, Anita. “Agricultural Commercialization: Its Positive Effects on African Women Farmers.” Development Economics and Policy. Vol. 23: 13-36. 2001.

Spring, Anita. “Gender Issues and Farming Systems Research,” Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Enset Cultivation. S. Brandt, T. Abata, and C. Hiebsh, eds. Addis Ababa: Institute of Agricultural Research. 1996.

Spring, Anita. “Gender and Environment: Some Methods for Extension Specialists,” Training for Agriculture and Rural Development. Rome: FAO. 1996.

Spring, Anita. “Guidelines for Evaluating the Inclusion of Women and Gender in Development Projects,” Forum Valutazione, No. 5, Rome, Italy. pp. 57-72. 1993.

Spring, Anita. “Women Farmers, Structural Adjustment and FAO’s Plan of Action for Integration of Women in Development with V. Wilde. In C. Gladwin, Structural Adjustment and African Women Farmers. Univ. of Florida Press. pp. 387-408. 1991.

Spring, Anita. “Profiles of Men and Women Smallholder Farmers in Malawi,” in R. Huss-Ashmore and S. Katz, eds. African Food Systems in Crisis. Part Two: Contending with Change. New York: Gordon and Breach. pp. 107-136. 1990.

Spring, Anita. “FAO’s Plan of Action for the Integration of Women in Development and its Relation to INGOs,” International Federation for Home Economics, 265: 4:34-35. 1989.

Spring, Anita. “Putting Women in The Development Agenda: Agricultural Development in Malawi.” In D. Brokensha and P. Little, eds. Anthropology and Development in East Africa. Boulder: Westview Press. pp. 13-42. 1988.

Spring, Anita. “FSR/E, Development Indicators and Food Self-Sufficiency at the Household Level.” How Systems Work: Proceedings of the Farming Systems Research Symposium 1987. University of Arkansas and Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development. pp. 155-177. 1987

Spring, Anita. “Using Male Research and Extension Personnel to Target Women Farmers.” Proceedings of the Kansas State University Farming Systems Research Symposium 1985. No. 8, pp. 123-142, 1986. Reprinted elsewhere in 1987 and 1988.

Spring, Anita. “Women Farmers and Food in Africa Issues: Some Considerations and Suggested Solutions” In A. Hansen and D. McMillan, eds. Food in Sub-Saharan Africa. Boulder: Lynne Rienner, pp. 332-348, 1986. Reprinted elsewhere in 1987.

Spring, Anita. “Men and Women Participants in a Stallfeeder Livestock Program in Malawi,” Human Organization 45:1:154-162. 1986.

Spring, Anita. “Reaching Female Farmers through Male Extension Workers.” in Training for Agriculture and Rural Development. Rome: FAO/UNESCO/ILO, No. 38, pp. 11-20. 1986. (Also French and Spanish versions).

Spring, Anita. “Trials and Errors: Using Farming Systems Research in Agricultural Programs for Women” in J. Jones and B. Wallace, eds. Applying Social Science in Farming Systems Research. Boulder:  Westview Press, pp. 129-150. 1986

Spring, Anita. “The Women in Agricultural Development Project: Making Gender Free Development Work.” in R. Gallin and A. Spring, eds. Women Creating Wealth: Transforming Economic Development. Washington, DC, Association for Women in Development. pp. 60-66. 1985.

Spring, Anita, and Art Hansen. “The Underside of Development: Agricultural Development and Women in Northwest Zambia.” in Agriculture and Human Values, 2:1:60-67. 1985.

Spring, Anita. “The Apprenticeship System in Northwest Zambia.” in B. du Toit and I. Abdullah, eds. African Healing Strategies. New York: Trado-Medico Books, 135-150. 1985.

Spring, Anita. “Men and Women Participants in a Stallfeeder Livestock Program in Malawi,” (unrevised version) in C. Flora, ed. Proceedings of Kansas State University’s 1983 Farming Research Symposium. No. 6. pp. 726-742. 1984.

Spring, Anita. “Reaching Female Farmers through the Male Extension Staff.” in Extension Aids Circular. Ministry of Agriculture, Government of Malawi, Lilongwe, Malawi. 1983.

Spring, Anita. “Women and Men as Refugees: Differential Assimilation of Angolans in Zambia.” in A. Hansen and A. Oliver-Smith, eds. Involuntary Migration and Resettlement: the Problems and Responses of Dislocated Peoples. Boulder: Westview Press. pp. 37-47. 1982.

Spring, Anita. “Women and Men as Refugees: Differential Assimilation of Angolans in Zambia, Disasters: The International Journal of Disaster Studies and Practice. 3:4:423-438. 1978.

Presentations

(I= Invited; R = Refereed papers)

China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) in Africa: Which Railways, Highways, Airports and Ports? Which Chinese Companies? Conference on BRI, University of Florida April 2019. (I) (R)

Tales of Resistance, Resilience, and Adaptation: From Whence and to Where for Africanist Anthropology, on the 25th Anniversary of the AfAA (I), San Jose, November 2018.

Conversations on Fieldwork and Research, American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting, San Jose November 2018.

Famines and Food Crises in Africa: Causes, Consequences and Remediation: How Anthropologists Are Responding? Washington DC December 2017.

Distinguished Lecture: What Helps or Hinders African Women in the Marketplace? Micro-to-Global Enterprises. Association for Africanist Anthropology, American Anthropological Association annual meeting, Minneapolis, November 19, 2016 (I)

Round Table: The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and Food Security. American Anthropological Association annual meeting, Minneapolis, November 20, 2016

Plenary speaker: African Women Entrepreneurs: Barriers and Successes in Micro-Large-Scale Enterprises. Centre for Business and Development Studies, Copenhagen, April 6, 2016 (I)

Women and Agriculture Mandates at FAO:  History, Training and Monitoring, Global Institute, University of Basel, Switzerland, August 28, 2014

Food Security: Gendered and Non-gendered from Small-scale to Commercial Agriculture International Congress of Anthropological and Ethological Sciences, Tokyo, Japan. May 17, 2014. Delivered via Skype

Agricultural Innovation in Africa: Gendered and Non-gendered Paradigm Shifts. Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, November 18, 2013. (I)

Plenary speaker: Food Security & Agricultural Innovation: Gendered & Non-gendered. Scientific, Spiritual, and Moral Challenges in Solving the World Food Crisis.  Institute on Religion in an Age of Science. Silver Bay, New York. July 24, 2013. (I, R)

Chinese Migration to Sub-Saharan Africa: Chinese Business Endeavors and African Reactions. University of Urbino, Urbino, Italy, March 2013. (I)

Black History Month Plenary speaker: Chinese Migration and the Business Environment in Ghana: A New Diaspora to Sub-Saharan Africa. University of California, San Diego, February 2013. (I)

African Women on Corporate Boards, African Development Conference, Univ. of Kansas, October 2, 2009. (I, R)

Committee on Sustainable Development (CSD 17), United Nations, New York

Women, Land and Commercial Ventures in Africa. May 9, 2009. (I)

“Decent Work”, Livelihood Strategies, and the Environment.” XVI ISA World Congress of Sociology. RC-40: Sociology of Agriculture and Food Durban, South Africa. July 26, 2006. (R)

“Empowering Women in the African Entrepreneurial Landscape: Microentrepreneurs to Business Globalists in the Informal and Formal Sectors.” Cornell University. April 21, 2006

“Paradigms of African Entrepreneurship in the Formal to Informal Sectors.”

African Studies Center, Lisbon, Portugal. December 8, 2005. (I)

“The West African Enterprise Network: Business Globalists, Interregional Trade and U.S. Interventions. University of Texas, Arlington, Conference on U.S. and West Africa.” April 29, 2005. (I, R)

Plenary Speaker “Investing in Women Entrepreneurs to Help Economic Development.”, University of Asmara, Eritrea Research Symposium. June 2002. (I)

INTERNATIONAL ACADEMY OF AFRICAN BUSINESS & DEVELOPMENT (R)

Plenary speaker “Getting Business Information at a Ready Glace: The Sub-Saharan Business Environment Report Updates.” International Academy of African Business and Development. Bridgetown, Barbados. May 29, 2014 (I, R)

Plenary speaker “The Sub-Saharan Business Environment Report 2012-2013 Findings.” International Academy of African Business and Development. Accra, Ghana. May 15, 2013 (I, R)

“The Sub-Saharan Business Environment, 2011 Findings.” El Jadida, Morocco. May 2012. (R)

Plenary speaker “Sub-Saharan Business Environment: Indicators for the 20 Largest Economies.” Edmonton, Canada. May 27, 2011. (I, R)

“Chinese and Agribusiness in Africa.” Kampala, Uganda, 2009. (R)

“China in Africa: African Views of Chinese Investments and Entrepreneurship.” (with Yang Jiao). Gainesville, May 21, 2008. (R)

“Conventional and Global African Women Entrepreneurs: Modeling the Similarities and Differences.” London, May 31, 2007. (R)

“The Entrepreneurial Landscape in Africa: Reconsidering Women in the Formal and Informal Sectors.” Accra, Ghana, May 25, 2006. (R)

“African Women Entrepreneurs: Micro levels to Globalists.” Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. April 6, 2005. (R)

“The Chinese in Ghana and Mozambique: Migration and Investment Strategies.” American Anthropological Association, Denver, November 2015 (R)

Food Security: 2014 International Year of Family Farming”. Gendered and Non-gendered from Small-scale to Commercial Agriculture, American Anthropological Association, Washington DC, December 2014 (R)

“Public and Private Business Environments and Transnational Migration of the Chinese in Ghana.” Chicago, November 2013 (R)

Women, Agriculture and Climate Change.” American Anthropological Association San Francisco, November 2012 (I)

“Food Actors: Victors and Victims in Ethiopia.” American Anthropological Association Montreal, Canada. November 2011 (R)

“Chinese and Tanzanian economic interactions: Studying transnational south-south migration and its effects on trade and economic opportunities? ” With Christine Avenarius. 2010. New Orleans (R)

“Food Security, Food Sovereignty & Land Grabs in Africa.” 2010. American Anthropological Association, New Orleans (R)

“Food Security & Land Grabs for Agriculture”. American Anthropological Association

Philadelphia, December 2009 (R)

“China in Africa: Agricultural Assistance and Agribusiness.” San Francisco, 2008.

“Ester Boserup’s WID Paradigm Based on Agriculture: Can We Revise It Now?” Washington. November 29, 2007 (R, I)

“Commercial Ventures for African Women Farmers: Was Boserup Always Right?” San Jose Calif. November 19, 2006.

“The Entrepreneurial Landscape: Informal to Formal Sector Models.” Washington. December 1, 2004 (R)


International Activities and Field Work

Research and fieldwork were carried out in Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Jamaica, Kenya, Malawi, Somalia, St. Lucia, Senegal, South Africa, Swaziland, Uganda, and Zambia. Development projects were designed, implemented, and evaluated in Botswana, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cambodia, India, Haiti, Kenya, Malawi, Somalia, Swaziland, Thailand, and Zimbabwe. Policy advice was provided to governments in Chile, Malawi, Norway, Somalia, and Thailand. International conferences were attended in Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, El Salvador, Germany, Italy, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Malawi, the Netherlands, Norway, and Trinidad. My Fulbright was in Ethiopia. Training and workshops were carried out in Barbados, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Netherlands, and St. Lucia. Universities were contacted for exchange and other programs in Cameroon, Eritrea, Ghana, Jamaica, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Farming Systems R&D and Participatory Appraisals with Smallholder Farmers

Training of Professional Staff that was followed by in-depth work with women and men smallholder farmers: Ethiopia, Jamaica, Kenya, Malawi, St. Lucia, Swaziland

AFRICA

Botswana
  • Women Entrepreneurs and Policy, 2006
  • Income Production Projects for Women, 1987
Cameroon
  • University Curriculum and Agricultural Development, 1980
Eritrea
  • Health Care and Health Delivery Systems; Enterprise Development; Demobilized Soldiers, 2002
Ethiopia
  • Civil Society, Gender, and Democracy and Governance, 2004
  • African Entrepreneurs in the Global Marketplace, 2000
  • Food Security with Enset-based Agricultural systems:1993, 1996-97
Ghana
  • Conservation Agriculture Production Systems. 2013
  • Chinese and African entrepreneurs. 2012
  • Micro-finance; E-commerce and Entrepreneurship, 2006
  • The New Generation of African Entrepreneurs in the Global Marketplace, 2000
  • Universities in Ghana, 1977
Kenya
  • Women and commercial agriculture. 2006
  • The New Generation of African Entrepreneurs in the Global Marketplace, 2001
  • Agricultural Commercialization and Gender Roles, 1996
Ivory Coast (Cote d’Ivoire)
  • International Conference on Market Towns 1989, Part 2 USAID
  • International Conference on Market Towns, 1988 Part 1 USAID
Malawi
  • Mainstreaming Women’s Programs with a focus on Credit,1990
  • Agricultural Development, Farming Systems Research and Extension, Policy, Training, Curriculum Enhancement, Women’s Programs, 1981-1983
Mozambique
  • The economy after the War, 1992
  • Entrepreneurs in the Formal Sector, New Generation of African Entrepreneurs in the Global Marketplace 2009
Senegal
  • The New Generation of African Entrepreneurs in the Global Marketplace, 2003
  • Islam in West Africa, 2003
Somalia
  • Agricultural Development and Women’s Programs, 1987
South Africa
  • Decent Work research 2006
  • State of Florida Trade Mission, also University Exchange programs 2001
  • The New Generation of African Entrepreneurs in the Global Marketplace, 2000, 2006
Swaziland
  • Commercial Agriculture and Marketing, 1993

Farming systems Rapid Rural Appraisal, 1993

Tanzania
  • The New Generation of African Entrepreneurs in the Global Marketplace, 2005
Uganda
  • Entrepreneurs in the formal sector, 2009
  • The New Generation of African Entrepreneurs in the Global Marketplace, 2001
  • Makerere University, 1970
Zambia
  • Food and Agriculture Organization documents, 1998
  • Infant and Maternal Health, 1977
  • Traditional Religious and Health Care Systems, 1970 to 1972
Zimbabwe
  • Income Production Projects for Women, 1987

CARIBBEAN AND SOUTH AMERICA

Barbados
  • 2014, Updates
  • Deliver Training on Women in Agricultural and Farming Systems, 1984, 1985
Chile
  • Mainstreaming Women’s Programs, 1990
El Salvador
  • FAO Interagency Meeting for Latin America, 1991
Haiti
  • Conservation Agriculture Production Systems. 2013
Jamaica
  • Environmental Contaminants and Human Activities, 1994-1995
St. Lucia
  • Participatory Rural Appraisals, Curriculum Development, 2000

ASIA

Cambodia
  • Conservation Agriculture Production Systems, 2013
India
  • Watershed Management and Farming Systems, 1989
Japan
  • International Conference on Ethiopia, 1997
Thailand
  • Farming Systems, 1989; 2013

EUROPE

Austria
  • Commission on the Status of Women and Inter-Agency Meetings for FAO, 1989-1991
Bulgaria
  • World Conference of Women and Trade Unions, 1989
Czech Republic
  • European Commission on Agriculture, Women and the Rural Family, 1989
Germany
  • University of Bonn and GFZ, Women and Agriculture, 1999
Italy
  • Expert Consultation on Women and Food Production, 1993
  • FAO, 1988-92, 2002, 2004, etc.
Norway
  • Training in Gender Analysis (Bergen), 1991
  • World Conference of Farmers (Trondheim), 1989
  • Government of Norway Women in Development in the UN system (Oslo), 1990
Netherlands
  • Global Consortium on Gender, Waginingen, 1998
  • Guest of Government to visit training institutes and universities, 1989