Lecturer
Office: Turlington B137
Email: sbogart@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Iowa State University, 2009
  • M.A. Anthropology, Iowa State University, 2005
  • B.A. Anthropology, Miami University, 2003
  • B.A. Zoology, Miami University, 2003

Research Interests

Non-human primates, great apes, chimpanzees, behavioral ecology, diet, tool use, communication, cognition, sociality/reproduction, conservation, Senegal, human evolution, human behavior


Personal Statement

Dr. Bogart’s primary research focus is to understand how the environment influences behavior in correlation with evolution. Chimpanzees, human’s closest living relative, are the focus of her research. Dr. Bogart integrates interdisciplinary methods and themes from anthropology, behavioral ecology, biology, and neuroscience. She has conducted research with both captive and wild primates, including capuchin monkeys, gorillas, orangutans, bonobos, and chimpanzees. Research topics include behavioral ecology of chimpanzees, chimpanzee tool-use, great ape communication, sociality, and prosociality.

Dr. Bogart has collaborated on research carried out at Yerkes National Primate Center, MD Anderson Biomedical Research Center, and the Milwaukee and Jacksonville Zoos. She has conducted over 14 years of research in Senegal, West Africa at the Fongoli savanna chimpanzee site at Mt. Assirik Research Site (MARS) in the Niokola-Koba National Park.

Conservation efforts are prominent in research primates and Dr. Bogart’s main focus is on developing action plans to sustain the chimpanzee populations in Senegal. Efforts involve working closely with local government agencies.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

  • Assistant Professor of Teaching, Biological Sciences, Human and Evolutionary Biology, University of Southern California, 2018
  • Lecturer, Biological Sciences, Human and Evolutionary Biology, University of Southern California, 2014-2017
  • Assistant Professor, Anthropology, Lawrence University, 2013-2014
  • Postdoctoral Associate, Neuroscience Institute and the Language Research Center, Georgia State University, 2012-2013
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Agnes Scott College, 2010-2012
  • Visiting Lecturer, Anthropology, University of California San Diego, Spring 2010
  • Visiting Lecturer, Anthropology, Iowa State University, Spring 2008

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors


Selected Publications

Pruetz JD, Bogart SL, Lindshield SM. In Press. Savanna chimpanzees at Fongoli, Senegal, use tools to reconcile an extreme environment. Chapter for Chimpanzees in Context, In Press

Pruetz JD, Bogart SL, Lindshield SM, Walkup K. Feeding-related tool use in primates. In: Lambert JE & Rothman J, Eds. Primate Diet and Nutrition: Needing, Finding, and Using Food. In Press

Taglialatela JP, Russell JL, Pope SM, Morton T, Bogart S, Reamer LA, Schapiro SJ, Hopkins WD. 2015. Multimodal communication in chimpanzees. Am J Primatol 77: 1143-1148.

Leroy F, Cai Q, Bogart S, et al. 2015. A new human-specific brain landmark: The depth asymmetry of the superior temporal sulcus. PNAS 112 (4): 1208-1213.

Bogart, S. L., Bennett, A. J., Schapiro, S. J., Reamer, L. A., Hopkins, W. D. (2014). Different early rearing experiences have long-term effects on cortical organization in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Developmental Science. Vol. 17 (2), pp. 161-174.

Bogart, S. L., Pruetz, J. D., Ormiston, L. K., Russell, J. L., Meguerditchian, A., Hopkins, W. D. (2012). Termite fishing laterality in the Fongoli savanna chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus): Further evidence of a left hand preference. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. Vol. 149, pp. 591-598.

Bogart, S. L., Mangin, J., Schapiro, S. J., Reamer, L., Bennett, A. J., Pierre, P. J., Hopkins, W. D. (2012). Cortical sulci asymmetries in chimpanzees and macaques: A new look at an old idea. Neuroimage. Vol. 61 (3), pp. 533-541.

Bogart, S. L., Pruetz, J. D. (2011). Insectivory of Savanna Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) at Fongoli, Senegal. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. Vol. 145 (1), pp. 11-20.

Bogart, S. L., Pruetz, J. D. (2008). Ecological context of savanna chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus) termite fishing at Fongoli, Senegal. American Journal of Primatology. Vol. 70 (6), pp. 605-612.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

National Science Foundation – High-Risk Research in Anthropology:
  • Key Personnel (50%),
  • Habituation Feasibility Assessment for Critically Endangered Pan troglodytes verus in a Savanna Environment at Parc National du Nioklo-Koba, Senegal
  • $34,967 (May 2017 – May 2018)
USC Women in Science and Engineering Supplemental Faculty Support
  • Principal Investigator (100%) – $5,000 (May-July 2017)
Primate Conservation, Inc.:
  • Co-PI (50%),
  • Disease transmission prevention between critically endangered western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) and research agents at Mont Assirik in Parc National du Niokolo-Koba, Sénégal
  • $4,355 (May 2017 – May 2018)
The Leakey Foundation:
  • Principal Investigator (100%).
  • Savanna chimpanzee ecology at MARS (Mount Assirik Research Site).
  • $24,783 (May 2015 – Nov 2016)

Courses Taught

Photo of Arianne Boileau

Graduate Student
Email: aboileau7@ufl.edu


Education

  • Ph.D. Anthropology, University of Florida, In Progress
  • M.A. Anthropology, Trent University, 2013
  • B.A. Archaeology, Université Laval, 2010

Subfield

Archaeology


Chair

Dr. Kitty Emery


Research Interests

Human-environment interactions, political economy, colonialism, trade, diet, zooarchaeological method and theory, taphonomy, Mesoamerican and Maya archaeology


Selected Publications

Morin, Eugène, Elspeth Ready, Arianne Boileau, Cédric Beauval, and Marie-Pierre Coumont. 2016. Problems of Identification and Quantification in Archaeozoological Analysis, Part I: Insights from a Blind Test. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory. doi:10.1007/s10816-016-9300-4.

Morin, Eugène, Elspeth Ready, Arianne Boileau, Cédric Beauval, and Marie-Pierre Coumont. 2016. Problems of Identification and Quantification in Archaeozoological Analysis, Part II: Presentation of an Alternative Counting Method. Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory. doi:10.1007/s10816-016-9301-3.

Rice, Prudence M., Arianne Boileau, Leslie G. Cecil, Susan D. deFrance, Carolyn Freiwald, Nathan J. Meissner, Timothy W. Pugh, Don S. Rice, and Matthew P. Yacubic
2018 Zacpeten Structure 719: Activities at a Contact-period Popol Nah before Rapid Abandonment. Ancient Mesoamerica 29(1):137–155.


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

  • Rothman Doctoral Fellowship in the Humanities, Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere, 2019-2020
  • Florida Museum of Natural History Bullen Award, 2018
  • Dienje Kenyon Memorial Fellowship, Society for American Archaeology, 2016
  • Sigma Xi Grants-in-Aid of Research, Sigma Xi, 2016
  • SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, 2014–2018
  • Doctoral Research Scholarship, Fonds de recherche du Québec – Société et Culture, 2013–2014
deFrance
Professor
Office: Turlington Hall, Room B1350
Office Phone: (352) 294-7541
Lab: Turlington Hall, Room B117
Email: sdef@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D.
  • M.A.
  • B.A.

Research Interests

Zooarchaeology, Andes


Personal Statement

My research focus is historical and prehistoric zooarchaeology. I have conducted research in the Southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and the Central Andes. My research is interdisciplinary in focus with an emphasis on both the dietary and the environmental realms. Research and education in anthropology should include an understanding of how and why humans used animal resources through time. Not only were animals important for dietary or subsistence needs but animals are often imbued with ritual significance. Furthermore, faunal remains are often excellent proxy data for past environmental conditions. I also use zooarchaeology as a bridge to cultural studies in the origin and maintenance of traditional foodways and cuisine.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Selected Publications

2016 Origin of pre-Columbian guinea pigs from Caribbean archeological sites revealed through genetic analysis.  B. Kimura et al. Journal of Archaeological Science Reports 5:442–452. Kimura et al. aDNA guinea pigs JASReports

2014 Guinea Pigs in the Pre-Columbian West Indies, M. J. LeFebvre and Susan D. deFrance, Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 9:1, 16-44.  article pdf 

2013 Late Prehispanic Coquina Quarrying and Tomb Construction in Coastal Southern Peru. S. D. deFrance and Elizabeth Olson, Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 8(1):1-14. sdef and Olson JICA

2012 Fauna Local e Importada: Dieta y Uso de Animales en el Potosí Colonial Chungará (Chile) 44(1):9-24.  Chungara pdf

2011 Isotopic Evidence for Middle Horizon to Sixteenth Century Camelid Herding in the Osmore Valley, Peru. Erin Kennedy Thornton, Susan D. deFrance, John Krigbaum, and Patrick Ryan Williams, International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 21: 544–567.

2010 Paleopathology and Health of Native and Introduced Animals on Southern Peruvian and Bolivian Spanish Colonial Sites. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 20(5): 508-524.   article pdf

2009 Documenting 12,000 Years of Coastal Occupation on the Osmore Littoral, Peru, Susan D. deFrance, Nicci Grayson, and Karen Wise, Journal of Field Archaeology 34(3):227-246.  article pdf

2009 Zooarchaeology in Complex Societies: Political Economy, Status, and Ideology, Journal of Archaeological Research. Volume 17, Number 2 / June, 2009 DOI10.1007/s10814-008-9027-1 Pages 105-168.  article pdf

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught