Photo of Carola Salazar

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: csalazar@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D.,
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2014
  • B.A.,

Subfield

Cultural


Chair

Dr. Collings


Research Interests

Medical Anthropology, Public Health, Cultural Constructs of Aging, Latin America, North America


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

Photo of David Markus

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: dmarkus@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D.,
  • M.A.,
  • B.A.,

Subfield

Archaeology


Chair

Dr. Davidson


Research Interests

Historical Archaeology, Jewish Diaspora Studies, African Diaspora Studies, Material Culture and Folk Beliefs, Performance Studies, North America


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

Associate Professor and Department Chair, Department of Anthropology

Office: Turlington Hall, B135
Phone: (352) 294-7593
Email: pcollings@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Penn State University, 1999
  • M.A., University of Arkansas, 1994
  • B.A., Bowdoin College, 1990

Research Interests

Cultural anthropology, human development, human ecology, hunting and gathering societies, Canadian Arctic, contemporary Inuit peoples


Personal Statement

Dr. Collings’ research focuses on the Inuit of the Canadian Arctic. Though his research interests are varied, they revolve around two central themes, human development and human ecology.

The human development dimension draws on traditions in psychological anthropology and the anthropology of aging, and addresses the influence of historical time, social change and economic success on different age cohorts, on the structure of the Inuit life course, and on Inuit conceptions of successful aging.

The human ecology dimension of his research addresses the economics of contemporary subsistence, the influence of externally imposed regulations on foraging activities, change and continuity in food sharing practices within the context of climate change, and, most recently, the relationships between food insecurity and health and mental health.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

Honors


Selected Publications

Collings, Peter, Meredith G. Marten, Tristan Pearce, and Alyson Young. 2016. Food Insecurity, Sharing Networks, and Female-Headed Households in Arctic Canada. Ecology of Food and Nutrition 55(1):30-49.

Collings, Peter. 2014. Becoming Inummarik: Men’s Lives in an Inuit Community. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press.

Collings, Peter. 2011. Economic Strategies, Community, and Food Networks in Ulukhaktok, NT, Canada. Arctic. 64(2):207-219.

Collings, Peter. 2009a. Birth Order, Age, and Hunting Success in the Canadian Arctic. Human Nature 20(4):254-274.

Collings, Peter. 2009b. Participant Observation, Phased Assertion, and Fieldwork with Inuit. Field Methods 21(2): 133-153.

Collings, Peter. 2005. Housing Policy, Aging, and Life Course Construction in a Canadian Inuit Community. Arctic Anthropology 42(2):50-65.

Collings, Peter. 2001. “If You Got Everything, It’s Good Enough:” Inuit Perspectives on Successful Aging. Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 16:127-155.

Collings, Peter. 2000. Aging and Life Course Development in an Inuit Community. Arctic Anthropology 37(2):111-125.

Collings, Peter, George Wenzel, and Richard G. Condon. 1998. Modern Food Sharing Networks and Community Integration in the Central Canadian Arctic. Arctic 51(4):301-314.

Condon, Richard G., Peter Collings, and George Wenzel. 1995. The Best Part of Life: Subsistence Hunting, Ethnic Identity, and Economic Adaptation among Young Adult Inuit Males. Arctic 48:31-46.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Courses Taught

 

Valerie Burke DeLeon
Davidson
Associate Professor 
Office: Turlington Hall, Room B134
Phone: (352) 294-7592
Email: davidson@ufl.edu
Website

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Texas at Austin, 2004
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, 1999
  • B.A., Archaeological Studies, University of Texas at Austin, 1990

Research Interests

Historical archaeology (19th/20th century), African diaspora, mortuary studies, folk beliefs


Personal Statement

 


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Selected Publications

Davidson, James M. (2015). “A Cluster of Sacred Symbols”: Interpreting an Act of Animal Sacrifice at Kingsley Plantation, Fort George Island, Florida (1814-1839). International Journal of Historical Archaeology 19(1).

Davidson, James M. 2014. Deconstructing the Myth of the “Hand Charm”: Mundane Clothing Fasteners and Their Curious Transformations into Supernatural Objects. Historical Archaeology 48(4).

Davidson, James M., and Karen E. McIlvoy. 2012. New Perspectives from Old Collections: Potential Artifacts of African Spirituality at Couper Plantation, Georgia. The Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage 1(2):107-166.

Davidson, James M. 2012. Encountering the Ex-Slave Reparations Movement from the Grave: The National Industrial Council and National Liberty Party, 1901-1907. The Journal of African American History 97(1-2):13-38.

Davidson, James M. 2012. “They laid planks ‘crost the coffins”: The African Origin of Grave Vaulting in the United States. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 16(1):86-134.

Davidson, James M. and Robert C. Mainfort, Jr. 2012. Hidden Differences Beneath a Surface Equality: Mortuary Variability in Two Late Nineteenth-Century Cemeteries in Crawford County, Arkansas. Southeastern Archaeology 30(2):203-214.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught

 

Kugelmass
Professor, Department of Anthropology

Melton Legislative Professor and Director, Center for Jewish Studies

Office: Walker Hall, Room 201
Phone: (352) 392-9247
Email: jkugelma@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., New School for Social Research
  • M.A., New School for Social Research
  • B.A., McGill University

Research Interests

 


Personal Statement

I am a cultural anthropologist with a background and continuing interest in critical theory. I’ve done fieldwork in Poland and New York City and have an increasing interest in Israel. I’ve long considered myself an urban anthropologist with a strong connection both to traditional neighborhood ethnography as well as to public culture and the study of museums, festivals and restaurants. I have a love for ethnography, writing and photography and enjoy teaching all three. In recent years I’ve become increasingly fascinated by the anthropology of travel. Some of my research in this area involves participation observation, but I find myself increasingly drawn to the study of travel books. My current project looks at Yiddish travel books over a fifty year period between the First World War until the 1960s. Although there are a number of interesting theoretical foci to the essays in this study, the fact is that I like narrative and am drawn to these books in part because of that, and I try to use translation to communicate to readers the narrative strengths of this minor literary genre. The anthropology in these essays is to analyze the social and political issues that underlie the narratives, to see how a group uses the imaginary realm of elsewhere to think through its own predicament especially when its present and future are precarious and home and citizenship are increasingly contested.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors


Selected Publications

Kugelmass, J. 2014. Sifting the Ruins: Emigre Jewish Journalists’ Return Visits to the Old Country, 1946-1948. University of Michigan, pp. 1-62.

Kugelmass, J. 2013.’I’m a Gentile!’ Border Dramas and Jewish Continuity. In Dynamic Belonging: Contemporary Jewish Collective Identities, edited by Harvey Goldberg, Steven M. Cohen, and Ezra Kopelowitz, pp. 223-236. Berghahn Books, New York.

Kugelmass, J. 2010. Rites of the Tribe: The Meaning of Poland for American Jewish Visitors. In Tourists and Tourism: A Reader, edited by Sharon Bohn Gmelch, pp. 369-396. Waveland Press, Long Grove, IL.

Kugelmass, J. (editor). 2006. Jews, Sports and the Rites of Citizenship. Illinois University Press, Champaign.

Kugelmass, J. (editor). 2003. Key Texts in American Jewish Culture. Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Courses Taught