Graduate Student
Email: toombshannah@ufl.edu


Education

  • Ph.D. Anthropology, In Progress
  • M.A. Anthropology, University of Florida, 2018
  • B.A. Anthropology, Penn State University, 2016
  • B.A. Spanish Language, Penn State University, 2016

Subfield

Cultural Anthropology

Latin American Studies (area of interest)


Chair

Dr. Catherine May Tucker


Research Interests

My major areas of study include sociocultural anthropology (economics, environment, development), applied anthropology, visual anthropology, material culture (particularly pottery) and indigenous rights with a focus on Latin America, particularly Honduras.

My dissertation research focuses on the impacts of socioeconomic change on indigenous tradition, particularly craft production, household decision-making, market access, gender roles, and environment within indigenous Lenca communities across western Honduras. Through a mixed methods approach, I explore how changing sociopolitical and environmental conditions impact the way indigenous groups perceive their traditional livelihoods and roles and how Lenca craft producers creatively adapt in the face of development to connect with a complex and changing national market.

I believe in linking research to action, and my goal is to create data, publications, and other research results that are accessible and applicable beyond academia, potentially informing policy-making and development practice in the future.


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

  • Paul & Polly Doughty Research Award, UF Department of Anthropology, April 2019
  • Boonstra Family Research Fellowship, UF Department of Anthropology, March 2019
  • UF Anthropology Poster Competition, 2nd Place Winner, December 2019
  • Department of Anthropology and Land Use and Environmental Change Institute Spring Travel Award, February 2019
  • UF Anthropology Poster Competition, 2nd Place Winner, April 2018
  • Grinter Fellowship, UF Department of Anthropology, August 2017
  • Ruegamer Scholarship, Bank of America, August 2017
  • Undergraduate Digital Publishing Award, Penn State Department of History, April 2016
  • Ceramic Studies Award, Penn State Department of Anthropology, March 2015

2017 Visual Anthropology @ UF Call for Entries

The University of Florida Department of Anthropology is hosting a screening of videos and photographs created by students enrolled in the ANT 3390 Visual Anthropology Class, with additional contributions from other faculty and students in the department. 

The screening is open to the public and will be held on Thursday, April 27th at 6pm in Norman Hall. 

2017 Visual Anthropology @ UF Call for Entries

The University of Florida Department of Anthropology is hosting a screening of videos and photographs created by students enrolled in the ANT 3390 Visual Anthropology Class, with additional contributions from other faculty and students in the department. 

The screening is open to the public and will be held on Thursday, April 27th at 6pm in Norman Hall. 

Photo of Christopher LeClere

Graduate Student
Email: cleclere@ufl.edu


Education

  • Ph.D. Anthropology, University of Florida, In Progress
  • M.Phil. Ethnographic Documentary, University of Manchester
  • B.A. Cultural Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Subfield

Cultural Anthropology 


Chair

Dr. Catherine May Tucker


Research Interests

Coffee, Food, Nostalgia, Identity and Performance, Media, Body Modification, Visual Anthropology


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

Photo of Rachel Wayne

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: rwayne86@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D.,
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2018
  • B.A.,

Subfield

Cultural


Chair

Dr. Stepp


Research Interests

Bullying, Anthropology of Violence, Media Anthropology, Folklore Studies, Visual Anthropology, Caribbean Studies, Ethnoecology


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

Photo of Jelena Brezjanovic-Shrogen

Alumni

Email: jbrezjanovic@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Florida
  • M.A., Anthropology, Wichita State University, 2011
  • B.A., International Business, Wichita State University, 2002
  • A.B.A., Business Administration, Butler Community College, 1999

Subfield

Cultural Anthropology


Chair

Dr. John Richard Stepp


Research Interests

International migration, return migration, globalization, language, cognition, visual anthropology, new media, South Europe, Balkans, Serbia


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

  • Recognition of Outstanding Contribution to the Tropical Conservation and Development
    Program (TCD) and Amazon Dams Network (ADN), University of Florida, 2015
  • “Cultural Ambassador” Award, presented by Wichita State University International
    Department, 2001

This student has graduated from the program so the information on this page may not be current.

UF Research Foundation Professor, Anthropology and Tropical Conservation and Development Program
Office: Grinter Hall, Room 337
Phone: (352) 392-0299
Lab: Turlington Hall, Room B375
Email: stepp@ufl.edu
Website
Google Scholar


Education

  • Ph.D.
  • M.A.
  • B.A.

Research Interests

Cultural ecology, ecological anthropology, ethnobotany, medical anthropology, visual anthropology, Mesoamerica


Personal Statement

Rick (John Richard) Stepp is UF Research Foundation Professor of Anthropology at the University of Florida. He is a core faculty member of the Tropical Conservation and Development Program and the Land Use and Environmental Change Institute. He is also an affiliate faculty member of the School of Natural Resources and Environment and several other interdisciplinary centers focused on environmental research. He has conducted conservation research over the last two decades throughout the tropics, especially in the Maya Forest and in the Greater Mekong Region of Southeast Asia. His research explores persistence, change and variation of traditional ecological knowledge and ethnobiology. Much of this work has focused on wild food plants and medicinal plants. His work has also focused on patterns and causes in the distribution of biological and cultural diversity (biocultural diversity). He is leading the Quest 3 experiential learning initiative at UF and also serves as online coordinator for the Department of Anthropology. He is an associate editor for several journals in environmental anthropology and ethnobiology. He is past-president of the Society for Economic Botany and current president of the International Society of Ethnobiology.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

Honors

 


Selected Publications

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Courses Taught

Kugelmass
Professor, Department of Anthropology

Melton Legislative Professor and Director, Center for Jewish Studies

Office: Walker Hall, Room 201
Phone: (352) 392-9247
Email: jkugelma@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. New School for Social Research
  • M.A. New School for Social Research
  • B.A. McGill University

Research Interests

 


Personal Statement

I am a cultural anthropologist with a background and continuing interest in critical theory. I’ve done fieldwork in Poland and New York City and have an increasing interest in Israel. I’ve long considered myself an urban anthropologist with a strong connection both to traditional neighborhood ethnography as well as to public culture and the study of museums, festivals and restaurants. I have a love for ethnography, writing and photography and enjoy teaching all three. In recent years I’ve become increasingly fascinated by the anthropology of travel. Some of my research in this area involves participation observation, but I find myself increasingly drawn to the study of travel books. My current project looks at Yiddish travel books over a fifty year period between the First World War until the 1960s. Although there are a number of interesting theoretical foci to the essays in this study, the fact is that I like narrative and am drawn to these books in part because of that, and I try to use translation to communicate to readers the narrative strengths of this minor literary genre. The anthropology in these essays is to analyze the social and political issues that underlie the narratives, to see how a group uses the imaginary realm of elsewhere to think through its own predicament especially when its present and future are precarious and home and citizenship are increasingly contested.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors


Selected Publications

Kugelmass, J. 2014. Sifting the Ruins: Emigre Jewish Journalists’ Return Visits to the Old Country, 1946-1948. University of Michigan, pp. 1-62.

Kugelmass, J. 2013.’I’m a Gentile!’ Border Dramas and Jewish Continuity. In Dynamic Belonging: Contemporary Jewish Collective Identities, edited by Harvey Goldberg, Steven M. Cohen, and Ezra Kopelowitz, pp. 223-236. Berghahn Books, New York.

Kugelmass, J. 2010. Rites of the Tribe: The Meaning of Poland for American Jewish Visitors. In Tourists and Tourism: A Reader, edited by Sharon Bohn Gmelch, pp. 369-396. Waveland Press, Long Grove, IL.

Kugelmass, J. (editor). 2006. Jews, Sports and the Rites of Citizenship. Illinois University Press, Champaign.

Kugelmass, J. (editor). 2003. Key Texts in American Jewish Culture. Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, NJ.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Courses Taught