University of Florida Homepage

Graduate Student
Email: khcoutts@ufl.edu


Education

  • Ph.D. Anthropology, University of Florida, In Progress
  • M.S. Educational Leadership, Radford University, 2018
  • M.A. Anthropology, University of Florida, 2008
  • B.A. Anthropology, SUNY Stony Brook, 2003

Subfield

Cultural


Chair

Dr. Chris McCarty


Research Interests

Education and Anthropology, cognitive anthropology, cultural consensus theory, violence and aggression


Selected Publications

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

Photo of Macarena Moraga Agurto

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email:   macarenamoraga@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Florida, In Progress
  • M.A., Latin American Studies, University of Florida, 2016
  • B.A., Anthropology, University of North Florida, 2013

Subfield

Cultural Anthropology


Chair

Dr. Kernaghan 


Research Interests

Social Memory, Political and Legal Anthropology, Dictatorship Violence in Latin America, Human Rights, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of the Media

Macarena Moraga’s research explores the ramifications of past violence in the present. Her Master’s thesis involved the study of the construction of social memory of the dictatorships that occurred in Chile (1973-1990) and Brazil (1964-1985) via fictionalized TV shows and among viewers who belonged to the post-dictatorship generation. Currently she is exploring the current legal and social efforts to bring accountability to medical and military personnel who collaborated in interrogation sessions in military hospitals in Rio de Janeiro during the Brazilian dictatorship.


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 Awards

  • Charles Woods Thesis Award for Best Master’s Thesis. Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida, 2016
  • Southeastern Council of Latin American Studies (SECOLAS), Edward H. Moseley Award for Best Graduate Student Paper, March 12-15, 2015
  • Outstanding Anthropology Graduate, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work, University of North Florida, April 2014
  • University of North Florida, Latin Honors: Summa Cum Laude (every semester), 2011-2013
  • President’s Honor Roll, University of North Florida, for outstanding academic performance, having achieved a 4.0 GPA (every semester), 2011-2013
  • Award for Outstanding Poster Presentation at the Fourth Annual Sociology and Anthropology Undergraduate Student Symposium at the University of North Florida, April 12  2013

Graduate School Fellowships

  • Graduate School Fellowship, Department of Anthropology, University of Florida, 2017-2021
  •  Academic Year Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship, University of Florida, 2015-2016
  • Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship (FLAS), For advanced study of Brazilian Portuguese in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June-August 2015
  • Academic Year Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship (FLAS), Spring 2015
  • Graduate Assistantship, Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida , 2014

Research Grants 

  • University of Florida, Latin American Studies Field Research Grant, 2015 

 

Photo of Rachel Wayne

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: rwayne86@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D.,
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2018
  • B.A.,

Subfield

Cultural


Chair

Dr. Stepp


Research Interests

Bullying, Anthropology of Violence, Media Anthropology, Folklore Studies, Visual Anthropology, Caribbean Studies, Ethnoecology


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

Photo of Marlon Carranza Zelaya

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: mcarranza@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2018
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2012
  • B.A.,

Subfield

Cultural


Chair

Dr. Abramowitz


Research Interests

Central America, Day Laborers, Structural Violence, Cultural Anthropology of Violence


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

Please join us for the second Crimescapes series lecture organized by the Crime, Law, and Governance in the Americas program at the Center for Latin American Studies. Anthropologist Dr. Kees Koonings (Utrecht University and University of Amsterdam), one of the 2016 Bacardi visiting scholars, will deliver a talk on “Criminal governance in Latin America: ‘New violence’, power, and territoriality.” The event will take place next Wednesday, February 10, 5-6pm at Ustler Hall. Reception to follow. More information below and in the flyer attached.

Criminal governance in Latin America. ‘New violence’, power, and territoriality

Kees Koonings

CEDLA, University of Amsterdam & Department of Anthropology, Utrecht University 

Over the past decades, many Latin American countries have been presenting the paradoxical combination of consolidated democracy and increasing levels of criminal violence and public insecurity. This so-called ‘new violence’ is constitutive for present-day ‘crimescapes’ in Latin America. The constitution of these crimescapes have important and highly ambiguous implications for politics, governance, and even the fundamental question of territorial sovereignty. I will approach this problem from the perspective of ‘criminal governance’. I understand criminal governance to be the exercise of power or the ability to rule (partly) outside the legal-bureaucratic-democratic frame of the modern state for – at least in part – illicit objectives.  

Kees Koonings is Professor of Brazilian Studies at the Centre for Latin American Research and Documentation (CEDLA), University of Amsterdam and Associate Professor in Development Studies and Latin American Studies in the Department of Anthropology at Utrecht University.

Please join us for the second Crimescapes series lecture organized by the Crime, Law, and Governance in the Americas program at the Center for Latin American Studies. Anthropologist Dr. Kees Koonings (Utrecht University and University of Amsterdam), one of the 2016 Bacardi visiting scholars, will deliver a talk on “Criminal governance in Latin America: ‘New violence’, power, and territoriality.” The event will take place next Wednesday, February 10, 5-6pm at Ustler Hall. Reception to follow. More information below and in the flyer attached.

Criminal governance in Latin America. ‘New violence’, power, and territoriality

Kees Koonings

CEDLA, University of Amsterdam & Department of Anthropology, Utrecht University 

Over the past decades, many Latin American countries have been presenting the paradoxical combination of consolidated democracy and increasing levels of criminal violence and public insecurity. This so-called ‘new violence’ is constitutive for present-day ‘crimescapes’ in Latin America. The constitution of these crimescapes have important and highly ambiguous implications for politics, governance, and even the fundamental question of territorial sovereignty. I will approach this problem from the perspective of ‘criminal governance’. I understand criminal governance to be the exercise of power or the ability to rule (partly) outside the legal-bureaucratic-democratic frame of the modern state for – at least in part – illicit objectives.  

Kees Koonings is Professor of Brazilian Studies at the Centre for Latin American Research and Documentation (CEDLA), University of Amsterdam and Associate Professor in Development Studies and Latin American Studies in the Department of Anthropology at Utrecht University.

Associate Professor
Honors Program Liaison
Office: Grinter Hall, Room 335
Phone: (352) 294-7585
Email: kernaghan@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. Columbia University
  • M.A. Columbia University
  • B.A. University of Texas at Austin

Research Interests

Ethnographic writing, aesthetics, visuality; law, violence, and illicit worlds; Latin America, Peru, Amazonia; political and legal time; memory/forgetting, divination and presentiment; state margins and settler frontiers; the social lives of rivers and rural roads.


Personal Statement

I am an ethnographer of political-legal communities and events. My research examines aftermaths of war and the everyday experience of law in state frontiers where (counter)insurgency and illicit economies overlap. My first book Coca’s Gone (Stanford, 2009) is an ethnography of a post-cocaine boom in a region of Central Peru known as the Upper Huallaga Valley; it reflects on how local narratives of a violent past bear the traces of law-making processes at the margins of the state. It also explores the potential of ethnographic writing to convey the visceral ambience of threat-laden worlds. Currently, I am working on a second, companion monograph—titled Semblance in Terrain: legal topographies and aftermaths of war—which draws on oral histories, photographs, video, storytelling as well as fieldwork encounters to document shifting patterns of rural mobility following the defeat of the Maoist Shining Path. Rural landscapes of the Upper Huallaga have been materially refigured but also affectively transformed in the wake of war. This project asks how the transition to that postwar era can be grasped aesthetically through the subtle but deliberate ways people mark off territory as they craft everyday itineraries between town and country.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Select Publications

Kernaghan, R. 2009. Coca’s Gone: of Might and Right in the Huallaga Post-Boom, Stanford University Press.

Kernaghan, R. 2012. “Furrows and Walls, or the Legal Topography of a Frontier Road in Peru.” Mobilities 7(4): 501-520.

Kernaghan, R. 2013. “Readings of Time: of Coca, Presentiment and Illicit Passage in Peru” In Times of Security: Ethnographies of Fear, Protest and the Future, edited by Martin Holbraad and Morten Axel Pedersen. Routledge, 118-156.

Kernaghan, R. 2014. “Time as Weather. Corpse-work in the Prehistory of Political Boundaries.” In Governing the Dead: Sovereignty and the Politics of Dead Bodies, edited by Finn Stepputat, Manchester University Press, 179-202.

Kernaghan, R. 2015. “Cocaine’s Minor Destinies—Ephemerality and legal threat on the margins of the Peruvian state.” American Ethnologist. 42(4): 658–672.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught