Upcoming Lectures and Talks

We have two upcoming FASA lectures:

Today, we have a lecture from Douglas Trent, titled ““Jaguars and Professional Opportunities.”  Trent is an ecologist by training and the executive director of the Instituto Sustentar (https://institutosustentar.net/) and the Research Director of the Pantanal Wildlife Program (www.bichosdopantanal.org).  He will be speaking about his jaguar population research and career opportunities in wildlife and sustainability.

The talk will be in 1208a Turlington at 2 pm. Light refreshments will be provided.

Next Week, January 31, we have two talks.  Dr. Kelly Sams will present her talk “Disease X: An Anthropological History,”

which will be followed by Alex Lowie, who will present his paper “Narratives of the Trayvon Martin Shooting.”  The session will begin at 4 pm, in 1208a Turlington.

Florida Museum seminar

Following today’s FASA talk, head down to the The FMNH seminar this afternoon at 3 pm, in Dickinson Hall. Dr. Gabriel Prieto will present a talk, “Massive Child and Camelid Sacrificial Practices in the North Coast of Peru: Understanding the Role of Ritual Violence in Ancient Societies.

Digital Ethnography – Grounded Engagements with Online Worlds

The Anthropology Department and the Center for African Studies are sponsoring a workshop featuring Dr. Victoria Bernal, UC Irvine.  The workshop also includes presentations by UF faculty members and students, followed by an open dialogue with Dr. Victoria Bernal. The workshop features short presentations by UF faculty members and students and is open to anyone interested in exploring how we as anthropologists and social scientists engage with ethnography – both as a method and form of communication – to make sense of an increasingly digitalized world.  Time and date: Saturday, January 25, Marston Science Library L136.  A Light breakfast will be served 9:30-10:00, with the workshop running from 10:00-1:00.

 

Awards and Recognitions

Congratulations to Dr. Myrian Barboza, who has been named the 2019 recipient of the Marianne Schmink Dissertation Award.  Dr. Barboza’s dissertation is titled Tiikuna cosmopolitical cartography: the gendered meaning and use of territories by Katukina indigenous people (Bia River, Brazilian Amazonia).”  The Marianne Schmink Outstanding Dissertation Award was established in 2010 in recognition of Dr. Marianne Schmink for her significant and transformative contributions to graduate education, the Center for Latin American Studies and the TCD Program.

UF Alum Dr. Amy Cox-Hall (Ph.D. Anthropology 2010) was recently featured in the Amherst College Alumni Magazine for her work on her teaching, which culminated in the art exhibition“Eat! An Exhibition Seminar at the Mead,.”  Find the full article here.

 

 International La Salle Summer Academy

The International La Salle Summer Academy is an initiative where visiting lecturers from accredited institutions around the world come to Bogota-Colombia to give interdisciplinary short term courses addressed to international and national students in the months of June, the theme for 2020 is “Rethinking the Future”

Rethinking the future is the theme of an academic initiative that aims to invite faculty and doctoral candidates worldwide to the La Salle International Summer Academy 2020, to reflect and teach about the meaning of the idea of the future in times when utopias and dystopias are being questioned in the midst of conflicted perspectives about the present. This program invites to look to the past to take into account the progress and changes that have taken place and then think on what may occur in the future. The Summer Academy looks for reflection on our society and its possible improvements and tries to establish interdisciplinary relationships between students from different backgrounds.  Find more information here.

 

 

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

 

Awards Section

Please join me in congratulating Brittany Mistretta, who has been awarded a UF Thompson Earth Systems Institute (TESI) Lifelong Learner’s Grant for her proposal titled “Florida Archaeology and Arts in Medicine: Exploring the Art and Environment of Early Native Florida in Hospital Outreach”. Drawing on Florida archaeological collections curated at the Florida Museum and in collaboration with the UF Health Shands Arts in Medicine Program, Brittany will design and implement workshops that incorporate Florida archaeology objects. These objects will serve as artistic inspiration and educational media to teach how Florida’s indigenous people were, and continue to be, tied to Florida’s ecosystems through cultural practices that relied on environmental resources. Workshops will increase accessibility to collections and science content, while improving patient well-being via science-inspired art and expression. Brittany’s project is a great example of bridging anthropology, biosphere science, and arts in an informal education setting.

Upcoming Talks

Digital Ethnography – Grounded Engagements with Online Worlds: The Anthropology Department and the Center for African Studies are sponsoring a workshop featuring Dr. Victoria Bernal, UC Irvine.  The workshop also includes presentations by UF faculty members and students, followed by an open dialogue with Dr. Victoria Bernal. The workshop features short presentations by UF faculty members and students and is open to anyone interested in exploring how we as anthropologists and social scientists engage with ethnography – both as a method and form of communication – to make sense of an increasingly digitalized world.  Time and date: Saturday, January 25, Marston Science Library L136.  A Light breakfast will be served 9:30-10:00, with the workshop running from 10:00-1:00.

Trade Wars, Trade Talks, and Trade Truths: What should we make of the return to protectionism?”  Dr. Dave Donaldson from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will deliver this public lecture in the Department of Economics.The lecture will be held 2:00-3:00pm on Friday, January 24th in Pugh Hall Atrium (Ocora). This public lecture is the endowed Bradbury Distinguished Lecture on International Economics.​

Decolonizing Knowledge: Indigenous Theories in Latin American and US Empire Studies. Thursday-Friday, 30-31 January 2020,  Dauer 215.  Sponsored by the Center for the Humanities and the Public Sphere,  the Department of English, the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program, the Department of History, Imagining Climate Change, the Latin American Studies Program, and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies.  The symposium begins 10:00-11:30 omg Thursday with a Keynote Address byAbraham I. Acosta ttiled “The Coloniality of Power, Settler Colonialism, and the Critique of Imperialism in Contemporary Times.”  For more information, please contact Leah Rosenberg at rosenber@ufl.edu.

Job Board

The Department of Anthropology, at York University in Canada invites applications for a teaching stream tenure-track appointment in Social-Cultural Anthropology at the Assistant Professor level to commence July 1, 2020. The position is for an expert in first year experience and teaching within the undergraduate program in the Department.  Full details here.

 

Enjoy your long weekend.

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

 

Workshops at the Center for Teaching Excellence

The Center for Teaching Excellence is dedicated to keeping faculty, staff, and teaching assistants connected and informed. Our goal is to help build a community of faculty members from all fields working together to share ideas and resources, to strengthen teaching, and maximize learning.  Workshops are open to both faculty and graduate students as noted, and include using apps in the classroom, team based learning, and improving online course delivery.  A full menu is available here.

UF Religious Observance Policy

A reminder from the Dean’s Office:

Students and faculty must work together to allow students the opportunity to observe the holy days of his or her faith. A student needs to inform the faculty member of the religious observances of his or her faith that will conflict with class attendance, with tests or examinations, or with other class activities prior to the class or occurrence of that test or activity. The faculty member is then obligated to accommodate that particular student’s religious observances. Because our students represent a myriad of cultures and many faiths, the University of Florida is not able to assure that scheduled academic activities do not conflict with the holy days of all religious groups. We, therefore, rely on individual students to make their need for an excused absence known in advance of the scheduled activities.

The UF Religious Holidays Policy is available at:

https://catalog.ufl.edu/UGRD/academic-regulations/attendance-policies/#religiousholidaystext

For University of Florida Students, the following guidelines apply: Students, upon prior notification of their instructors, shall be excused from class or other scheduled academic activity to observe a religious holy day of their faith. Students shall be permitted a reasonable amount of time to make up the material or activities covered in their absence. Students shall not be penalized due to absence from class or other scheduled academic activity because of religious observances.

If a faculty member is informed or is aware that a significant number of students are likely to be absent from class because of a religious observance, the faculty member should not schedule a major exam or other academic event at that time.

​A student who is to be excused from class for a religious observance is not required to provide a second party certification of the reason for the absence.

Furthermore, a student who believes that he or she has been unreasonably denied an education benefit due to religious beliefs or practices may seek redress through the student grievance procedure.

Thank you for your cooperation with this policy.

Job Board

The Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy at the University of Pennsylvania seeks applications for the Mitchell Center Postdoctoral Fellowship linked to our 2020-2021 series, “Free Speech Battles.”

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

2020-2021 Academic Year

Application Deadline: February 16, 2020

Apply through Interfolio at apply.interfolio.com/72667

The University of Pennsylvania’s Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy invites applications for a one-year Postdoctoral Fellowship in any discipline whose research is pertinent to the theme of the Center’s 2020-2021 faculty workshop series, “Free Speech Battles.”  In addition to pursuing independent research, the postdoctoral fellow is expected to attend and participate in Mitchell Center events; teach one undergraduate course related to their academic interests; co-lead a research seminar for Mitchell Center undergraduate fellows; and attend other Mitchell events whenever possible. The stipend is $53,800 plus benefits, including health insurance.  You can find more info here.

 

 

Enjoy your weekend!

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

 

Awards Section

Congratulations to Laura Van Voorhis and Kelly Muzycka, who both received Elizabeth Eddy Doctoral Dissertation Write-Up Fellowships.  Laura will be finishing her thesis, “Osteoarchaeological Evaluation of the Prehistoric Denizens of Fort Center, Florida” in Spring, 2020.  Kelly will be writing up her dissertation, “Race and Total Knee Replacements” in Summer, 2020.

Congratulations to Chris Clukay, who has been awarded a post-doctoral fellowship with the Science Corps, to begin after his graduation in May. Science Corps is a non-profit that works to foster science education in areas where it is lacking by connecting recent PhD graduates with schools and centers abroad. As part of the program, he will travel to one of the Science Corps field sites in either the Philippines or Rural India for six months on full funding. There he will both teach and aid in the development of science curriculums among primary school students and help to educate science teachers in those regions.

 

Training in Statistical Analysis at UF

UFIT is offering the SPSS Statistics and Sample Power 3 course and R Programming training series in spring 2020.

    • The SPSS and Sample Power course is a free, online, self-paced, seven-week course on statistical analysis.
    • The R Programing training series is free, face-to-face, eight-week training on statistical analysis and graphics.
    • The course and the training series are designed for faculty, staff, postdoctoral associates, TAs, and graduate students.

If you are interested in SPSS, you can register here.  (registration is for Summer, but you can be put on the waiting list for Spring).  If You’re interested in R, you may register here.   The R course begins on February 20.

 

Jobs and Other Opportunities

The International La Salle Summer Academy is an initiative where visiting lecturers from accredited institutions around the world, come to Bogota-Colombia to give interdisciplinary short term courses addressed to international and national students in the months of June, the theme for 2020 is “Rethinking the Future.”

Rethinking the future is the theme of an academic initiative that aims to invite professors worldwide to the La Salle International Summer Academy 2020, to reflect and teach about the meaning of the idea of the future in times when utopias and dystopias are being questioned in the midst of conflicted perspectives about the present. This program invites to look to the past to take into account the progress and changes that have taken place and then think on what may occur in the future. The Summer Academy looks for reflection on our society and its possible improvements and tries to establish interdisciplinary relationships between students from different backgrounds.   More information can be found here.

The University of Georgia Franklin College of Arts and Sciences is seeking applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology. We seek an outstanding scholar whose research and substantive interests focus on the anthropological archaeology of large-scale agricultural landscapes past, present and future in ways that connect human livelihood with biophysical and hydrological processes to form complex social-ecological systems.

Individual will hold the rank of Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology with responsibilities that include teaching, mentoring and supervising undergraduate and graduate students, developing, obtaining and carrying out independent research, and publishing findings in appropriate outlets.  More information here

The Departments of Anthropology and Biological Sciences at the University of Cincinnati invite applications for a joint tenure-track position with a focus in epigenetics and health beginning in the Fall 2020.  The tenure home of this position will be in the Department of Anthropology.

Both departments have faculty with strong research records in evolutionary change and seek to enhance their research programs by including expertise into the impact of environment and stress on vulnerable populations. The applicant will be expected to teach and develop courses relating to evolution and medicine, adaptation, epigenetics, and the environment. In addition to teaching duties, this hire is expected to maintain an active research program, advise and mentor students, and contribute to departmental and university service initiatives.  The candidate will have lab and/or field-based research program(s) that provide research opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students in both the Anthropology and Biology departments.  The candidate should also be able to teach Introduction to Biological Anthropology.  More Information here.

The Department of Sociology, Anthropology & Criminal Justice at Towson University is currently inviting applications for a tenure track assistant professor position in Anthropology with an Archaeology focus, beginning August 2020. We seek someone with a strong commitment to excellence in teaching and to working with a diverse student population. Geographic and research areas are open. The search ad for the position is enclosed. We plan to conduct on-campus interviews in late January/early February 2020.

 

Enjoy your holiday!

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

UF Meet-up at the AAAs

The UF Department of Anthropology is hosting a social mixer during the AAA / CASCA Annual Meeting in Vancouver, on Friday, November 22 beginning at 8:00pm and continuing until close.  Location: St. Regis Bar and Grill, 608 Dunsmuir Street.  It is roughly a 10 minute walk from the convention center.  We will provide hors d’oeuvers.  If you have questions, contact Chris LeClere at cleclere@ufl.edu / 1-704-412-7874.  Also, check out the invite on our facebook page here.  Or on our Instagram page, here.   I look forward to seeing you all there.

 

Awards Corner

I am pleased to note that Ph.D. students  Jamie Fuller, Sarah Staub, Oswaldo Medina-Ramirez, and Ben Smith have each received a RAD award from the University of Florida International Center.  Congratulations to all!

 

Anthropology Research Exhibition

The Department of Anthropology wants to showcase your research projects!  We are looking for both posters and videos from current graduate students and posters from current undergraduate anthropology students.

The prizes are a little different this semester:

1) Graduate Student Poster $750

1) Undergraduate Student Poster $250

1) Graduate Student Video $750

The department will pay to print a copy of your poster so we can display it in the halls of Turlington.  The winning poster(s) will be displayed in the chair’s office. The winning video will appear on the department’s YouTube channel.

Deadline for submission is Friday, November 22 by 5:00pm. Digital submissions should go to Chris LeClere. Hard copy posters can be dropped off in the anthropology office. Contact Chris LeClere cleclere@ufl.edu with questions.

 

Anthropology Holiday Party

It’s the most wonderful time of the year!  The Anthropology Holiday Party is fast approaching: it is December 4 this year, from 3-5pm, in the Keene Faculty Center.  As a reminder, this is a pot luck affair, so bring your most festive and/or delicious dish to share.  If you’re in a bind and don’t have time to prepare something, we’re happy to take donations to help with the costs of our catering.

As an additional draw, come and vote for you favorite research poster or video, as part of our Fall Research Exhibition!  Also, for faculty who have not yet done so, this is your chance to talk about your research program on camera.  We will be setting up to shoot profiles as part of the festivities, so wear your most outrageous holiday sweater.

FASA Colloquium

FASA is pleased to announce the kick-off of the 2019-2020 Colloquium series, with begins this afternoon at 4:15 in Turlington 1208.  Please come out and join this afternoon’s speakers:

Domenique Sorresso: Seeking Sources: A Provenance Study of Chickasaw Ceramics Using Thin-Section Petrography

Myles Sullivan: Dividing Lines: Understanding the Social Spaces of Boundaries at James Madison’s Montpelier

Felipe Acosta-Munoz: Language Revitalization and construction of ideologies of Yucatec Maya in narratives by language stakeholders in Yucatan, Méxic

On Friday,  November 22, come and hear presentations by:

Megan Hanna Fry: Social Differentiation and Identity in the Anglo Saxon Kingdom of Lindsey

Edward Quinn: Intergenerational impacts of maternal psychosocial stress in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Arianne Boileau: Spinning in circles (or not): the possible function of Maya perforated bone disks as spindle whorls

FASA is always looking for speakers — both faculty and students — to present their research.  Interested?  Contact Corinne Futch at corinnefutch@ufl.edu

 

Publications

Two of our former students, Dr. Meredith Marten and Dr. Noelle Sullivan, have a new article out in Social Science in Medicine: “Hospital side hustles: Funding conundrums and perverse incentives in Tanzania’s publicly-funded health sector.”  You can find it here.

Upcoming Talk

Dr. Kevin Meehan of the University of Central Florida will be giving a lecture, entitled “Voudou Inscriptions of the Self in Zora Neale Hurston’s Haitian Ethnography.”  The lecture is  third event of the FFRI guest speaker series ‘Inscriptions of the Self in the French and Francophone World’ and will take place on Monday November 18th at 3pm in the Scott Nygren Studio, Library West.

Funding Opportunities

The Laura Bassi Scholarship, which awards a total of $8,000 thrice per annum, was established by Editing Press in 2018 with the aim of providing editorial assistance to postgraduates and junior academics whose research focuses on neglected topics of study, broadly construed. The scholarships are open to every discipline and the next round of funding will be awarded in December 2019.  Applications are due by November 25, 2019, with results announced on 15 December.

All currently enrolled master’s and doctoral candidates are eligible to apply, as are academics in the first five years of their employment.

Applicants are required to submit a completed application form along with their CV through the application portal by the relevant deadline. Further details, previous winners, and the application portal can be found here.

I will be in Vancouver next week for AAAs, and then overeating the next, so the scrapbook will resume on December 6.  Enjoy the meetings, and enjoy your Thanksgiving break!

 

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

News and Notes from around the department, on what also happens to be National Cappuccino Day:

Publications and Press

UF Anthropology Ph.D. Justin Dunnavant is featured in the latest issue of Science, highlighting his research at Estate Little Princess in St. Croix.  You can find the online article here, which also includes a link to a .pdf version.

UF graduate student Terry Barbour and Dr. Ken Sassaman are the lead authors on a new paper, just published this week, in PNAS: “Rare pre-Columbian settlement on the Florida Gulf Coast revealed through high-resolution drone LiDAR.”  Their findings were also featured on the website Ars Technica (link here).  The original article can be found here.

AAA Vancouver UF Meet-Up

Are you heading to the AAA/CASCA meeting in Vancouver? The University of Florida Department of Anthropology will be hosting an informal gathering on Friday, November 22nd from 8:00pm until late! We are providing several trays of hors d’oeuvres, so come and unwind after the evening’s business meetings in Vancouver’s famous Gastown District.  Stay tuned for further details.

Awards Section

I am pleased to announce three recipients of CLAS Dissertation fellowships:

Arianne Bouleau received a CLAS fellowship for her dissertation work, “Identifying Household-level Political Economy on the Maya/Spanish Frontier:  A Zooarchaeological Perspective from Lamanai, Belize.”

Christina Callicott received a CLAS fellowship for her work, “Music, Plants and Medicine: Lamista Shamanism in the Age of Internationalization.”

Janet Finlayson received CLAS fellowship support for her research, “The Anatomical Variation of Corresponding Joint Surface Congruency and its Utility for the Resolution of Commingled Remains.”

Congratulations to all three!

Upcoming Talks

Shannon Lee Dawdy of the University of Chicago will give two talks:

On Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 4:00 pm, Smathers 100 will give a talk entitled Speculative Archaeology: The Politics of Disaster Debris.   The debris pile from 134,000 New Orleans buildings damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Katrina is visible from space. Although there was some effort to recycle materials through a little-known global market in demolition debris, most of the rubble amassed in place. In the future, archaeologists might reasonably consider the hurricane landfill a monumental structure. In the 1970s, Bill Rathje boldly suggested that an archaeological approach to contemporary life can reveal things about ourselves that we didn’t know. Modern landfills were his field sites. This talk thinks through Rathje’s garbology and the exceptionalism of disaster sites. Contestations reveal how important the management of debris and its ideological effects are to local and national governments. Trash is political. And politics is an assemblage of the human and the non-human, the intentional and the accidental.​

On Wednesday, November 13, 2019, 10:00 am, Marston Library L136, Dr. Dawdy will hold a workshop of the Imagineering the Technosphere group, titled  Repurposing the Past for the Future with Digital Technologies.  The past has a tenuous, often contentious, relationship with the future. We fragment and sequester the past, drawing memory from only those things we have at hand and rupturing continuities with the present by forgetting. Futures discounting exacerbates this myopic condition by playing on uncertainties to diminish the wisdom of looking too far ahead. How can digital technologies help bridge the past with the future? Examples from digital storytelling, augmented and virtual reality, and spatialized archives enable us to explore the potential for hetereotemporality, nonlinear histories, and the power of ruins and artifacts to experience other times and places. Workshop participants are invited to share their own efforts with digital technologies for repurposing the past for the future.​

Job Board

The Wesleyan University Anthropology Department has a full-time, one-semester visiting position (with benefits) for spring 2020. The successful candidate would teach two undergraduate-level courses and assist in advising undergraduate theses. The topical and/or area focus of the courses is open, though courses in the anthropology of health and illness are of special interest. Applicants should send a cover letter, CV, work sample, and teaching statement, including brief descriptions of courses they might teach, to Elizabeth Traube, Chair, etraube@wesleyan.edu by December 1.

 

Enjoy your weekend!

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

Hi All,

News and Notes:

 

Publications

The book DE  ARQUEOLOGÍA  HABLAMOS  LAS  MUJERES.  PERSPECTIVAS  SOBRE  EL  PASADO ECUATORIANO [Women Speak About Archaeology. Perspectives on Ecuador’s Past] was just published, with Ph.D. Candidate Josefina Vásquez a leader on this project and author of one of the chapters.  You can find more details here,  including a link to a .pdf of the book.

 

UF Alum Dr. Amanda Holmes-Concha and Professor Emritus Anthony Oliver-Smith recently published an edited book entitled “Disasters in Paradise: Natural Hazards, Social Vulnerability and Development Decisions” with Lexington Press.  Contributors include UF multiple anthropology grads, including  Sarah Cervone, Byron Real, Astrid Wigidal, and Joanna Reilly-Browne.  Find it here.

 

November is Native Heritage Month

Native Heritage Month is here again, and the Indigenous American Student Association has organized numerous for the month. Among the activities are a talk by Marcus Briggs-Cloud on the 12th of November in Keene-Flint 050 at 5-7 pm.  Marcus has done important work in advising the United Nations regarding the “Year of Indigenous Languages.”  A complete schedule of activities planned for the month is here.

 

Upcoming Lectures

The Department of Religion, as part of its annual Scudder Lecture Series, invites you to this timely event:  Becoming American – Keeping My Religion:  Religion and Identity among Second Generation New Immigrant College Students  By Dr. Haroon MoghulThe Shalom Hartman Institute of North America, Author of How to Be a Muslim: An American Story.  The Pugh Hall Ocora on Wednesday November 6, at 6 pm.  The event is co-sponsored by the Bob Graham Center for Public Service.  For more info, click here.

 

Language Training Opportunities

On Tuesday, November 5th, a representative of the Boren Awards will be visiting UF’s campus for the first time since 2012. Boren Awards are funded by the State Department to send currently enrolled undergraduate and graduate students abroad for the express purpose of intensive language learning, specifically for languages deemed critical to U.S. national security interests (broadly defined). Last year, about 25% of undergraduate and 40% of graduate applicants secured funding for study abroad through Boren’s competition.

 

Jeff Cary, the Boren representative, will hold information sessions specifically for students on Tuesday, November 5th; it begins at 4:15pm and in Florida Gym (FLG) 0320. No RSVP for the student session is needed.  Contact Kelly J. Medley at 352-392-1519 if you have questions about Boren and other prestigious fellowship opportunities.

 

Jobs

The Department of Anthropology and the Institute for Social Science Research (ISSR) of The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa invite applications for a full-time, Associate or Full Professor position in medical and/or psychological anthropology beginning Fall 2020. Topical and geographic specialization are open, though the applicant should complement existing specialties in Anthropology and ISSR and be well-versed in quantitative and qualitative research methods. The successful applicant will have research skills and interests that contribute directly to Anthropology’s undergraduate and graduate programs and ISSR’s role in grant writing and social science research design and implementation across the University. Particular emphasis in Anthropology will be placed in complementing the Ph.D. program and its focus on biocultural medical anthropology. The proposed faculty member will have teaching responsibilities that may include our undergraduate introductory courses in cultural or biological anthropology; other specific core undergraduate and graduate level classes in medical, biocultural, or psychological anthropology; and courses of their own development. Ph.D. is required. Preferred qualifications include a demonstrated commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and student success, as well as working with broadly diverse communities.  Full details: https://facultyjobs.ua.edu/postings/46020

 

Enjoy your weekend!

 

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

Some news and notes from around the department:

Publications

Dr Maxine Margolis, Professor Emerita in our very own Department of Anthropology, has a new book, hot off the Rodman and Littlefield press: Women in Fundamentalism: Modesty, Marriage, and Motherhood.  Get your copy here.

Career Planning at the AAA in Vancouver

The Archaeology Division is organizing a networking/mentoring session for students/recent grads at the AAA 2019 conference and registration is now open. The session is free for AAA attendees and we will be serving coffee/tea + light breakfast pastries! The session, Navigating Careers in Archaeology: A Student Mentoring Session , takes place on Thurs. Nov. 21, 2019, 8:00am-9:45am and will be led by professional archaeologists covering the following topics:

Academic Job Market: Dr. Elizabeth Chilton

Alternative Career Paths for Archaeologists in Higher Education: Dr. John Kantner

Collaborative Archaeology and Community Engagement: Dr. Whitney Battle-Baptiste

Cultural Heritage Careers: Dr. Marcie Venter

Grants and Funding in Archaeology: Dr. Lisa Lucero

Publishing for Academic and Popular Audiences:  Dr. Chip Colwell and Dr. Chris Pool

Each topic will be discussed in a small group setting at a table; to participate, please click this link to fill out this registration form and choose the topic you’re most interested in. Each group will be capped at 8-9 participants and slots are expected to fill up quickly.

Events

The first Decolonizing Representations: Past, Present and Future workshop focusing on the historical legacy of UF through creating a digital walking tour is today, from 8:30-5 in Smathers 100.  You can register on the livelink on the attached flyer or on the website.  https://decolonizingrepresentations.com

FLMNH Seminar Series this afternoon:  Please join us this afternoon, October 25th, for the next seminar in our FLMNH seminar series at 3PM in the Dickinson Hall seminar room, 371. Dr. Melissa Kemp (Assistant Professor, Department of Integrative Biology & Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin) will be presenting “Lizard diversity in the anthropocene: a paleontological perspective”

The Libraries are holding their first FALL FESTIVAL on Wednesday, October 30 from 10 am – 2 pm on the Reitz Lawn.  All Libraries plus Academic Research Consulting & Services (ARCS) will participate with games and information on the best the Libraries have to offer, along with free t-shirts, snacks, live music and therapy dogs!

Speculative Archaeology: The Politics of Disaster Debris – Shannon Dawdy (University of Chicago) November 12, 2019 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm in Smathers Library 100 The debris pile from 134,000 New Orleans buildings damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Katrina is visible from space. Although there was some effort to recycle materials through a little-known global market in demolition debris, most of the rubble amassed in place. In the future, archaeologists might reasonably consider the hurricane landfill a monumental structure. Trash is political.  In addition, there will be a workshop with Professor Dawdy on Repurposing the Past for the Future with Digital Technologies, November 13, 2019 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am in Marston Library L136.  More info here.

Job Board

Gettysburg College:   The Department of Anthropology at Gettysburg College invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in Anthropology beginning August 2020. We seek an archaeologist who specializes in public archaeology, museum studies, and/or stakeholder-community relations and who is committed to collaborating with indigenous or historically marginalized groups in knowledge production and representation. Their geographical focus can be based in the Americas, Africa, or Asia-Pacific. Find the complete job description here

The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Department of Anthropology invites applications for a tenure-track position in sociocultural anthropology at the assistant professor level, beginning on 1 September 2020. The department seeks a candidate whose work complements the existing strengths of the department and who can make contributions to our undergraduate major in anthropology, our concentration in Global Health and Migration, and our Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies degree.   The full job ad is posted here: https://careers.utrgv.edu/postings/22925.

National Council on Preservation Education Academic Year 2020 Internships is seeking a program specialist in the Tribal Historic Preservation Program, Cultural Resources Office of Tribal Relations and American Cultures, Program Specialist: 

The Tribal Historic Preservation Program (THPP) is the National Park Service (NPS) office responsible for reviewing and approving applications submitted by federally recognized Tribes to enter into Tribal Historic Preservation Office (THPO) partnerships with the NPS. Working with NPS staff, the intern will support the THPP by assisting with tracking and reviewing partnership applications, as well as providing grant and annual report review support to 194 approved THPO Partnership Programs. Duties will include processing and aggregating annual activities reports, document tracking/filing, and serving as a point of contact between the THPP and THPOs, as well as other NPS programs that support THPOs. Additional duties may include documenting and archiving THPP library items and tracking, reviewing, and drafting responses to incoming Tribal Historic Preservation Officer inquiries and program plans for review and approval by Program Staff. Depending on the applicant’s strengths and interests, duties could also include developing outreach materials for social media and web contexts and identifying new opportunities to reach out to prospective applicants. Experience in one or more of the following fields is required: Anthropology, Historic Preservation, Native American/Indigenous Studies, or Public Administration (or a related field). Experience with the National Historic Preservation Act or experience/enthusiasm for working with tribal cultural and historical resource management is preferred. Other required skills include: knowledge of Microsoft Office programs, experience with file or database management, and strong written communication and editing skills. If selected for an interview, you will be asked to submit a writing sample. Located in Washington, D.C. (1200 hours)

Stipends and Eligibility

Stipends are paid at $15/hour unless noted otherwise. Please note that interns are not NCPE or NPS employees; stipends are academic awards rather than wages. Taxes are not withheld, nor are social security contributions made on your behalf. These funds may be taxable, however, so consult a tax preparation professional if you have questions. To be eligible, applicants must be currently enrolled in an academic program or recently graduated (degree received Fall 2018 or later). On the listing the graduation date is listed as January 2019 or later, but I’ve been advised that the window is a year prior to applying. Interns are not eligible to work more than 1200 hours total in NCPE’s program. Previous interns must stay within this overall limit.

 

Enjoy your weekend,

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

Hi All,

The Friday Scrapbook is back after a two-week hiatus, so it is only fitting it comes out on a Thursday! Some Items from around the Department:

Coffee Symposium Starts Today!

The University of Florida Coffee Research Symposium will be held October 17-19.  Organized by our very own Chris LeClere, the deadline to submit a presentation or poster proposal for the first ever UF Coffee Research Symposium is quickly approaching! This three day event is being held at Aloft Hotel and will bring together international industry professionals and researchers who have a common interest in coffee (or caffeine). There will be coffee tastings, demonstrations, and discussions. The cost is free for all UF students, faculty, and staff and lunch is provided Saturday and Sunda.   www.ufcoffeeresearch.com for more information or email the conference organizer Chris LeClere cleclere@ufl.edu.

Publications

Dr. Dan Contreras has a new publication in the newest issue of Science Advances, “Earliest occupation of the Central Aegean (Naxos), Greece: Implications for hominin and Homo sapiens’ behavior and dispersals.”  You can find the article here.

2019 Doctoral Travel Research Awardees

Congratulations to Josefina Vasquez Matt Rooney, and Taylor Polvodore, all of whom were winners of the 2019 Summer Graduate School Doctoral Research Travel Award.  The awards provide funds for student travel to support their dissertation research.

Potlatch Success!

This year’s Potlatch was a tremendous success, with a fundraising total in excess of $4800!  As you know, the funds raised at Potlatch go to support the graduate student travel fund.  I understand that winning bids in the auction came from as far away as Hong Kong.  And special thanks to Brittany Mistretta for doing tremendous work in planning and organizing the event, and to all of the students who volunteered their time and labor to make it such a success.  Special thanks to Mark Brenner and Susan Milbrath for hosting.

Dr. Barbara Purdy in the Florida Gator

Dr. Barbara Purdy was recently featured in the Florida Gator, the UF Alumni Association Magazine. Dr. Purdy was UF Anthropology’s first Ph.D. graduate, and the article makes it clear that the only thing she’s “failed” at is retirement.  The website for the magazine is here, but the new issue is right off the presses and not posted yet. I’ve attached the article to this email.

Upcoming talks

Please join us Friday afternoon, October 18th, for the next seminar in the FLMNH seminar series at 3PM in the Dickinson Hall seminar room, 371. Dr. Andrea Lucky (Assistant Professor, Entomology & Nematology, University of Florida) will be presenting “Pavement ants to population genomics: how public participatory science can benefit invasion science”

On Friday, October 18th at 4pm in Smathers 100, Prof. Simon Goldhill, a renowned humanist and Classicist from the University of Cambridge will be talking about “The Infrastructure of Tolerance.” Find the link here.  ​This lecture examines how we might understand the relationship between urban infrastructures, and the logics of exclusion and inclusion around which the category of citizenship is understood and cultural identities are formed. It looks in particular at the role of city planners and some past urban planning projects that had the effect of brutalizing social life in urban areas. In studying these examples, we can see how the politics of fear play a major role in the shaping of urban atmosphere.

Please join the Humanities Center on October 24 and 25 for two events with Professor Ana-Lucia Araujo (Howard University, Department of History) as part of the Center’s 2019-20 speaker series: Rethinking the Public Sphere: Part 1 – Race and the Promise of Participation.  Dr. Araujo’s public lecture, “Museums and Slavery: Engaging the Past and the Present in the Public Sphere” will be held at 4:00 pm Thursday October 24, 2019 in Smathers Library 100.  More information here.

Job Board

The Department of Human Behavior, Ecology and Culture at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig (Germany) is seeking qualified applicants for a postdoctoral project on subsistence strategies in mixed economies.  The Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology unites scientists with various backgrounds (natural sciences and humanities) whose aim is to investigate the history of humankind from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The overarching aims of the project are to consider the relationships between socioeconomic status, kinship, environmental variability and subsistence decision-making in mixed economies. From an applied perspective, the research also seeks to identify cultural factors that promote Inuit food security and well-being. The primary responsibilities of the successful candidate will be to conduct analyses of existing foraging, social network, economic, and/or qualitative interview data from an Inuit community in Nunavik, Canada. Potential topical foci for the postdoctoral research may include food transfers, land use patterns, prey and patch choice during foraging, among other possibilities.

The contract period is for 3 years, and the appointment is based in Leipzig.  More details here.

 

Enjoy the coffee conference!

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida

 

Hi All,

It’s the Friday the 13th/Full Moon Edition of the Scrapbook.  This spooky combo only happens every 20-30 years, so be sure to save your copy:  this rare issue might be worth money someday on Ebay!

Some Items from around the Department:

Upcoming Events

Potlatch this year is October 12 — less than a month away!  For those of you new to UF, Potlatch is one of our annual rites of intensification and a significant fundraiser to help support our graduate students by auctioning off departmental artifacts, relics, and other items of dubious provenance  If you have legacy items for the auction, you may drop them off in our main office in Turlington. If you have an item you’d like to donate, you may also bring that to the main office in Turlington, preferably with a note about what it is and what it might be used for.  Alternatively, if  you’d like to directly to the Graduate Student Travel Fund, you may write a check, payable to the Graduate Student Travel Fund, sent directly to Karen Jones in our main office.  Watch this space for a signup sheet for volunteers.

Got coffee? The University of Florida Coffee Research Symposium will be held October 17-19.  Organized by our very own Chris LeClere, the deadline to submit a presentation or poster proposal for the first ever UF Coffee Research Symposium is quickly approaching! This three day event is being held at Aloft Hotel and will bring together international industry professionals and researchers who have a common interest in coffee (or caffeine). There will be coffee tastings, demonstrations, and discussions. The cost is free for all UF students, faculty, and staff and lunch is provided Saturday and Sunday. Both graduate and undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to apply.   www.ufcoffeeresearch.com for more information or email the conference organizer Chris LeClere cleclere@ufl.edu

Publications

Dr. John Krigbaum and graduate student Kylie Williamson are co-authors on a new paper, “The dead shall be raised”: Multidisciplinary analysis of human skeletons reveals complexity in 19th century immigrant socioeconomic history and identity in New Haven, Connecticut, published earlier this week in PLoS One.  (Find the article here; a summary from Yale University is here). dr. George Kamenov in Geological Sciences at UF is also an author on this paper.  Congratulations to all!

Intersections

Intersections Group on Ethics in the Public Sphere will hold their first Ethics Cafe event on Immigration on, Monday, September 16th in Smathers 100.  An Ethics Café is an informal gathering where people with diverse perspectives and experiences can talk about issues that matter to them. The goal is to facilitate reasoned, constructive, and civil conversations in which all the participants are able to join, and from which all will learn. Facilitators will be on hand to assist, but the cafes are student driven and open-ended.  Interested?  Want to know more?  You can contact Danielle Barrientos, Intersections Program Coordinator at humanities-center@ufl.edu or find their newsletter here.

Job Board

The Department of Anthropology at California State University, Long Beach is happy to announce a tenure track position in Biological Anthropology at the Assistant Professor rank. Successful candidates must have completed their Ph.D. by August 1, 2020. The faculty member is expected to teach undergraduate classes in support of anthropology and human development majors. Please see the full position description for examples. The applicants’ research area is open but ideal candidates will demonstrate experience working with living human populations and solid foundation in evolutionary theory and biological and biocultural theories and methods. We are particularly interested in applicants committed to undergraduate teaching, graduate student mentoring and the ability to involve students in research projects. Applicants whose work and experience demonstrates a strong commitment to the success of diverse students are particularly encouraged to apply.  For a full description of the position and information on how to apply, please go to the following link: http://www.csulb.edu/academic-affairs/faculty-affairs/assistant-professor-of-biological-anthropology-2578

The Department of Anthropology at Indiana University Bloomington seeks applicants for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Social-Cultural Anthropology with a demonstrated expertise in food and culture, a commitment to ethnographic research, and success in interdisciplinary collaboration and comparative work.

While preference will be given to scholars whose research addresses US food systems or comparative US/global food systems, we will also consider applicants working in other regions. Topical specializations might include: the intersections of contemporary food systems, environment/climate, and social change, food justice, food (in)security, and sustainability, and/or the political economies of food production, trade, and consumption at local, national, and international levels. More at https://careercenter.aaanet.org/jobs/12758088/assistant-professor-anthropology-of-food.  Applications due October 15th.

 

Enjoy your weekend,

Pete Collings

Associate Professor and Chair

Jessie Ball duPont-Magid Term Professor

Department of Anthropology

University of Florida