Photo of Joanna Troufflard

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: jtroufflard@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Florida (in progress)
  • M.A., Archaeology, New University of Lisbon, 2011
  • B.A., Archaeology and Art History, Paris-IV Sorbonne University, 2007

Subfield

Archaeology


Chair

Dr. Sassaman


Research Interests

Brazilian Amazon, Pre-Colonial Archaeology, Historical Ecology, Ceramics, Public Archaeology


Selected Publications

Cerâmicas da cultura Santarém, Baixo Tapajós. In Cerâmicas arqueológicas da Amazônia, ed. by C. Barreto, H. Lima, and C.J. Betancourt. pp. 245-260, Belem: Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi. 2016.

Well builders of the Belterra plateau (Lower Tapajos, Brazil): preliminary data. In Beyond Waters: Archaeology and Environmental History of the Amazonian Inland, ed. by P. Stenborg, pp. 37-46. GOTARC Series A, Gothenburg Archaeological Studies, Vol. 6. 2016. ISBN 978-91-85245-60-7.

Reflection on Archaeology and Sustainability in the Brazilian Amazon. In Proceedings of the 3rd World Sustain.Forum, 1-30 November 2013; Sciforum Electronic Conference Series, Vol.3, i003; doi:10.3390/wsf3-i003.

O que nos dizem as coleções da relação entre moradores e vestígios arqueológicos na região de Santarém, Pará? In Arqueologia, patrimônio e multiculturalismo na beira da estrada: pesquisando ao longo das rodovias Transamazônica e Santarém-Cuiabá, Pará, ed. by D. Schaan. pp. 59-74, Belém: GK Noronha. 2012.

Abordagem da prática colecionista através de um conjunto de peças marajoara do Museu Nacional de Etnologia em Lisboa (Portugal), Amazônica: 3 (1): 142-168. Revista de Antropologia. Belém: Universidade Federal do Pará. 2011.


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

  • Charles H. Fairbanks Award, Anthropology Dpt., University of Florida, 2016
  • Travel Award, Anthropology Dept. and LUECI, University of Florida, 2016
  • James C. Waggoner Jr. Grant-in-Aid, University of Florida, 2015
  • Tinker Travel Grant, Center for Latin American Studies, University of Florida, 2014
  • CAPES scholarship, Ministry of Education, Brazil, 2012/2016

Photo of Joshua Crosby

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: jacrosby@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Florida, Anthropology (In Progress)
  • M.A., University of Central Florida, Cultural Anthropology
  • B.A., University of Florida, Anthropology

Subfield

Cultural


Chair

Dr. Stepp


Research Interests

Recreational Hunting in Florida, Urban Foraging, Biophilia, Locavores, Ethnobiology, Ethnobotany, Amazon, Southern Africa.


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email:    c.callicott@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Florida, In Progress
  • M.A., Anthropology, University of Florida, 2014
  • B.A., Gender Studies, University of Colorado, 1995

Subfield

Cultural Anthropology


Chair

Dr. Collings


Research Interests

Ethnobotany, ethnomusicology, shamanism, environmental anthropology, bio-cultural diversity, indigenous peoples, political ecology, gender, Western Amazon


Selected Publications

Peer Reviewed

Callicott, Christina 2016 “Introduction to the Special Issue: Ayahuasca, Plant-Based Spirituality, and the Future of Amazonia.” Anthropology of Consciousness 27(2):113-20.

Callicott, Christina 2013 “Interspecies communication in the Western Amazon: Music as a form of conversation between plants and people.” European Journal of Ecopsychology 4:32-43.

Book Chapter

Callicott, Christina and Catherine Tucker. 2019. “Marketing Organic Foods in the United States.” Organic Food, Farming and Culture. Janet Chrzan and Jacqueline Ricotta, editors. Routledge.

Reports

Callicott, Christina, Bette Loiselle and Patricia Delamonica Sampaio 2015 Tropical Conservation and Development Program 2014 Alumni Survey Report. Gainesville: University of Florida Tropical Conservation and Development Program. Accessible at http://www.tcd.ufl.edu/Data/Sites/44/media/documents/reports/

Invited Reprints

Callicott, Christina. 2017 (In press) “Interspecies communication in the Western Amazon: Music as a form of conversation between plants and people” (translation–French). Cygne Noir: Revue d’Exploration Sémiotique 4(2017):n.p.

Callicott, Christina, translated by Catarina Barros. N.D. (In press) “Interspecies communication in the Western Amazon: Music as a form of conversation between plants and people” (translation–Portuguese). Chão da Feira Caderno de Leituras.


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

  • Firebird Foundation Fellowship for Anthropological Research, 2018, for dissertation research.
  • UF Graduate School Doctoral Research Travel Award, 2018, for dissertation research.
  • Second Place, Master’s Thesis category. UF Center for Latin American Studies Field Research Clinic Poster Competition, 2014.
  • TCD Field Research Grant, UF Center for Latin American Studies, to fund pre-dissertation research and site visits in the Peruvian Amazon, 2016.
  • Doughty Research Award, UF Department of Anthropology, 2016.
  • Conference Grant, Department of Anthropology and Land Use Environmental Change Institute (SALSA), 2015.
  • Conference Grant (SALSA), UF Tropical Conservation and Development Program, 2015.
  • Amaya-Burns Research Grant for pre-dissertation site visits in the Peruvian Amazon. UF Dep’t of Anthropology. 2015.
  • Conference Grant, UF Dep’t of Anthropology and Land Use Environmental Change Institute (AAA), 2014.
  • Conference Grant (AAA), UF Center for Latin American Studies, 2014.
  • Waggoner Field Research Grant, UF Dep’t of Anthropology, 2014.
  • Conference Grant (Toluca, Mex.) UF Tropical Conservation and Development Program, 2014.
  • Scholarship for summer study, UF Tropical Conservation and Development Program, 2014, for course in Tropical Plant Systematics, Organization for Tropical Studies, Costa Rica.
  • Scholarship for summer study, Organization for Tropical Studies, San Jose, Costa Rica, 2014, for course in Tropical Plant Systematics, OTS, Costa Rica.
  • Fellowship for Summer Foreign Language and Area Studies, UF Center for Latin American Studies, to study Amazonian Kichwa at the Andes-Amazon Field School, Tena, Ecuador. Summer 2013.
  • Field Research Grant, UF Center for Latin American Studies. Protocol title: Music, Plants and Healing: Shamanic Music in Western Amazonia. Summer 2013.
  • Honorable Mention, National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Competition, 2012, 2013.
  • Ruegamer Fellowship, UF Dep’t of Anthropology; March 2012. Three-year graduate fellowship.
  • Grinter Fellowship, UF Dep’t of Anthropology, 2012. Three-year departmental fellowship.

 

Professor
Office: Turlington Hall, Room B309
Phone: (352) 294-7586
Email: mheck@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh, 1996
  • Graduate Certificate in Latin American Studies, University of Pittsburgh, 1995
  • B.A., Anthropology, University of Vermont, 1988

Research Interests

Non-Western cultures of the humid tropics, especially Amazonia and Caribbean; pre-industrial complex societies; built environment, cultural memory and landscape; historical and political ecology; interdisciplinary approaches; anthropology of the body.


Personal Statement


 

Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Selected Publications

Heckenberger, Michael, and Eduardo Góes Neves. 2009. Amazonian Archaeology. Annual Review of Anthropology 38:251-266.

Heckenberger, Michael J., J. Christian Russell, Carlos Fausto, Joshua R. Toney, Morgan J. Schmidt, Edithe Pereira, Bruna Franchetto, and Afukaka Kuikuro. 2008. Pre-Columbian Urbanism, Anthropogenic Landscapes, and the Future of the Amazon. Science 321(5893):1214-1217.

Heckenberger, Michael J., J. Christian Russell, Joshua R. Toney, and Morgan J. Schmidt. 2007. The Legacy of Cultural Landscapes in the Brazilian Amazon: Implications for Biodiversity. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 362(1478):197-208.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught

 

Augusto Oyuela-Caycedo
Associate Professor
Office: Turlington Hall, Room B131
Phone: (352) 294-7590
Email: caycedo@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh, 1993
  • Certificate in Latin American Studies, University of Pittsburgh, 1993
  • B.A., Anthropology, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia, 1985

Research Interests

Historical ecology, evolution of ideology, ecology of religion, indigenous peoples of South America (especially the Amazon and the Andes), origins of technology and food production, history and theory of Latin American archaeology and anthropology

Personal Statement

 


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Selected Publications

Oyuela-Caycedo, Augusto. 2012. Biographical Archaeology: The Nazi Roots of Erasmus Reichel, Life in Austria (1912-1933). MEMORIAS Revista Digital de Historia y Arqueología desde el Caribe Colombiano 9(8):1-21.

Oyuela-Caycedo, Augusto. 2012. El Contexto Económico de la Alfarería Temprana en el Caso de San Jacinto 1. Boletín de Arqueología PUCP 10:285-304.

Oyuela-Caycedo, Augusto, and Alejandro Dever. 2011. The Agency of Academic Archaeology in Colombia. In Comparative Archaeologies: A Sociological View of the Science of the Past, edited by Ludomir R. Lozny, pp. 613-639. Springer, New York.

Oyuela-Caycedo, Augusto, and Renee M. Bonzani. 2005. San Jacinto 1: A Historical Ecological Approach to an Archaic Site in Colombia. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Associate Professor
Honors Program Liaison
Office: Grinter Hall, Room 335
Phone: (352) 294-7585
Email: kernaghan@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. Columbia University
  • M.A. Columbia University
  • B.A. University of Texas at Austin

Research Interests

Ethnographic writing, aesthetics, visuality; law, violence, and illicit worlds; Latin America, Peru, Amazonia; political and legal time; memory/forgetting, divination and presentiment; state margins and settler frontiers; the social lives of rivers and rural roads.


Personal Statement

I am an ethnographer of political-legal communities and events. My research examines aftermaths of war and the everyday experience of law in state frontiers where (counter)insurgency and illicit economies overlap. My first book Coca’s Gone (Stanford, 2009) is an ethnography of a post-cocaine boom in a region of Central Peru known as the Upper Huallaga Valley; it reflects on how local narratives of a violent past bear the traces of law-making processes at the margins of the state. It also explores the potential of ethnographic writing to convey the visceral ambience of threat-laden worlds. Currently, I am working on a second, companion monograph—titled Semblance in Terrain: legal topographies and aftermaths of war—which draws on oral histories, photographs, video, storytelling as well as fieldwork encounters to document shifting patterns of rural mobility following the defeat of the Maoist Shining Path. Rural landscapes of the Upper Huallaga have been materially refigured but also affectively transformed in the wake of war. This project asks how the transition to that postwar era can be grasped aesthetically through the subtle but deliberate ways people mark off territory as they craft everyday itineraries between town and country.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Select Publications

Kernaghan, R. 2009. Coca’s Gone: of Might and Right in the Huallaga Post-Boom, Stanford University Press.

Kernaghan, R. 2012. “Furrows and Walls, or the Legal Topography of a Frontier Road in Peru.” Mobilities 7(4): 501-520.

Kernaghan, R. 2013. “Readings of Time: of Coca, Presentiment and Illicit Passage in Peru” In Times of Security: Ethnographies of Fear, Protest and the Future, edited by Martin Holbraad and Morten Axel Pedersen. Routledge, 118-156.

Kernaghan, R. 2014. “Time as Weather. Corpse-work in the Prehistory of Political Boundaries.” In Governing the Dead: Sovereignty and the Politics of Dead Bodies, edited by Finn Stepputat, Manchester University Press, 179-202.

Kernaghan, R. 2015. “Cocaine’s Minor Destinies—Ephemerality and legal threat on the margins of the Peruvian state.” American Ethnologist. 42(4): 658–672.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught

 

Professor Emeritus of Anthropology 
Office:
Phone:352-392-0375
Email: schmink@ufl.edu
Grinter Hall, Room 301

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Texas
  • B.A., University of Michigan

Research Interests

Tropical conservation and development, gender and development


Personal Statement

She has authored (with Charles H. Wood) Contested Frontiers in Amazonia (Columbia University Press, 1992),in addition to four edited books, and dozens of articles, book chapters, and reports. Since 1990, Dr. Schmink has directed a collaborative research program in Acre, Brazil, focused on community-based resource management. She has worked on issues related to gender and development for over twenty years. Dr. Schmink has had major grants from the Mellon Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, Ford Foundation, Hewlett Foundation, and Moore Foundation to support collaborative research and training programs at UF.