Photo of Marissa Molinar

Graduate Student

Mailbox: Turlington Hall Rm 1112, PO Box 117305, Gainesville, FL 32611-7305
Email: mmolinar@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D.,
  • M.A.,
  • B.A.,

Subfield

Archaeology


Chair

Sassaman


Research Interests

Comparative Prehistoric Art, Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture, The Origins of Art Making, Evolutionary and Psychobiological Theory, Central and South America, Northwest and South Africa


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

deFrance
Professor
Office: Turlington Hall, Room B1350
Office Phone: (352) 294-7541
Lab: Turlington Hall, Room B117
Email: sdef@ufl.edu
Website

Education

  • Ph.D.
  • M.A.
  • B.A.

Research Interests

Zooarchaeology, Andes


Personal Statement

My research focus is historical and prehistoric zooarchaeology. I have conducted research in the Southeastern United States, the Caribbean, and the Central Andes. My research is interdisciplinary in focus with an emphasis on both the dietary and the environmental realms. Research and education in anthropology should include an understanding of how and why humans used animal resources through time. Not only were animals important for dietary or subsistence needs but animals are often imbued with ritual significance. Furthermore, faunal remains are often excellent proxy data for past environmental conditions. I also use zooarchaeology as a bridge to cultural studies in the origin and maintenance of traditional foodways and cuisine.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Selected Publications

2016 Origin of pre-Columbian guinea pigs from Caribbean archeological sites revealed through genetic analysis.  B. Kimura et al. Journal of Archaeological Science Reports 5:442–452. Kimura et al. aDNA guinea pigs JASReports

2014 Guinea Pigs in the Pre-Columbian West Indies, M. J. LeFebvre and Susan D. deFrance, Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 9:1, 16-44.  article pdf 

2013 Late Prehispanic Coquina Quarrying and Tomb Construction in Coastal Southern Peru. S. D. deFrance and Elizabeth Olson, Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 8(1):1-14. sdef and Olson JICA

2012 Fauna Local e Importada: Dieta y Uso de Animales en el Potosí Colonial Chungará (Chile) 44(1):9-24.  Chungara pdf

2011 Isotopic Evidence for Middle Horizon to Sixteenth Century Camelid Herding in the Osmore Valley, Peru. Erin Kennedy Thornton, Susan D. deFrance, John Krigbaum, and Patrick Ryan Williams, International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 21: 544–567.

2010 Paleopathology and Health of Native and Introduced Animals on Southern Peruvian and Bolivian Spanish Colonial Sites. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 20(5): 508-524.   article pdf

2009 Documenting 12,000 Years of Coastal Occupation on the Osmore Littoral, Peru, Susan D. deFrance, Nicci Grayson, and Karen Wise, Journal of Field Archaeology 34(3):227-246.  article pdf

2009 Zooarchaeology in Complex Societies: Political Economy, Status, and Ideology, Journal of Archaeological Research. Volume 17, Number 2 / June, 2009 DOI10.1007/s10814-008-9027-1 Pages 105-168.  article pdf

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught

 

Professor
Office: Turlington Hall, Room B309
Phone: (352) 294-7586
Email: mheck@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh, 1996
  • Graduate Certificate in Latin American Studies, University of Pittsburgh, 1995
  • B.A., Anthropology, University of Vermont, 1988

Research Interests

Non-Western cultures of the humid tropics, especially Amazonia and Caribbean; pre-industrial complex societies; built environment, cultural memory and landscape; historical and political ecology; interdisciplinary approaches; anthropology of the body.


Personal Statement


 

Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Selected Publications

Heckenberger, Michael, and Eduardo Góes Neves. 2009. Amazonian Archaeology. Annual Review of Anthropology 38:251-266.

Heckenberger, Michael J., J. Christian Russell, Carlos Fausto, Joshua R. Toney, Morgan J. Schmidt, Edithe Pereira, Bruna Franchetto, and Afukaka Kuikuro. 2008. Pre-Columbian Urbanism, Anthropogenic Landscapes, and the Future of the Amazon. Science 321(5893):1214-1217.

Heckenberger, Michael J., J. Christian Russell, Joshua R. Toney, and Morgan J. Schmidt. 2007. The Legacy of Cultural Landscapes in the Brazilian Amazon: Implications for Biodiversity. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 362(1478):197-208.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught

 

Augusto Oyuela-Caycedo
Associate Professor
Office: Turlington Hall, Room B131
Phone: (352) 294-7590
Email: caycedo@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, University of Pittsburgh, 1993
  • Certificate in Latin American Studies, University of Pittsburgh, 1993
  • B.A., Anthropology, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia, 1985

Research Interests

Historical ecology, evolution of ideology, ecology of religion, indigenous peoples of South America (especially the Amazon and the Andes), origins of technology and food production, history and theory of Latin American archaeology and anthropology

Personal Statement

 


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Selected Publications

Oyuela-Caycedo, Augusto. 2012. Biographical Archaeology: The Nazi Roots of Erasmus Reichel, Life in Austria (1912-1933). MEMORIAS Revista Digital de Historia y Arqueología desde el Caribe Colombiano 9(8):1-21.

Oyuela-Caycedo, Augusto. 2012. El Contexto Económico de la Alfarería Temprana en el Caso de San Jacinto 1. Boletín de Arqueología PUCP 10:285-304.

Oyuela-Caycedo, Augusto, and Alejandro Dever. 2011. The Agency of Academic Archaeology in Colombia. In Comparative Archaeologies: A Sociological View of the Science of the Past, edited by Ludomir R. Lozny, pp. 613-639. Springer, New York.

Oyuela-Caycedo, Augusto, and Renee M. Bonzani. 2005. San Jacinto 1: A Historical Ecological Approach to an Archaic Site in Colombia. University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Associate Professor
Honors Program Liaison
Office: Grinter Hall, Room 335
Phone: (352) 294-7585
Email: kernaghan@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. Columbia University
  • M.A. Columbia University
  • B.A. University of Texas at Austin

Research Interests

Ethnographic writing, aesthetics, visuality; law, violence, and illicit worlds; Latin America, Peru, Amazonia; political and legal time; memory/forgetting, divination and presentiment; state margins and settler frontiers; the social lives of rivers and rural roads.


Personal Statement

I am an ethnographer of political-legal communities and events. My research examines aftermaths of war and the everyday experience of law in state frontiers where (counter)insurgency and illicit economies overlap. My first book Coca’s Gone (Stanford, 2009) is an ethnography of a post-cocaine boom in a region of Central Peru known as the Upper Huallaga Valley; it reflects on how local narratives of a violent past bear the traces of law-making processes at the margins of the state. It also explores the potential of ethnographic writing to convey the visceral ambience of threat-laden worlds. Currently, I am working on a second, companion monograph—titled Semblance in Terrain: legal topographies and aftermaths of war—which draws on oral histories, photographs, video, storytelling as well as fieldwork encounters to document shifting patterns of rural mobility following the defeat of the Maoist Shining Path. Rural landscapes of the Upper Huallaga have been materially refigured but also affectively transformed in the wake of war. This project asks how the transition to that postwar era can be grasped aesthetically through the subtle but deliberate ways people mark off territory as they craft everyday itineraries between town and country.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

 

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

 

Honors

 


Select Publications

Kernaghan, R. 2009. Coca’s Gone: of Might and Right in the Huallaga Post-Boom, Stanford University Press.

Kernaghan, R. 2012. “Furrows and Walls, or the Legal Topography of a Frontier Road in Peru.” Mobilities 7(4): 501-520.

Kernaghan, R. 2013. “Readings of Time: of Coca, Presentiment and Illicit Passage in Peru” In Times of Security: Ethnographies of Fear, Protest and the Future, edited by Martin Holbraad and Morten Axel Pedersen. Routledge, 118-156.

Kernaghan, R. 2014. “Time as Weather. Corpse-work in the Prehistory of Political Boundaries.” In Governing the Dead: Sovereignty and the Politics of Dead Bodies, edited by Finn Stepputat, Manchester University Press, 179-202.

Kernaghan, R. 2015. “Cocaine’s Minor Destinies—Ephemerality and legal threat on the margins of the Peruvian state.” American Ethnologist. 42(4): 658–672.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

 

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught

 

Distinguished Service Professor

Professor Emeritus
Office: Turlington Hall, Room B356
Phone: (352) 294-7596
Email: moseley@ufl.edu
Website: http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/moseley

Education:

  • Ph.D., Anthropology, Harvard University, 1968
  • M.A., Anthropology, Harvard University, 1965
  • B.A., Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley, 1963

Research Interests

Settlement and subsistence patterns; early agricultural economies; preindustrial urbanism; pre-Hispanic architecture; pre-Hispanic irrigation and water management technology; Colonial Period and Spanish contact settlements; GIS/Remote Sensing; Quaternary geomorphology, climatology and tectonics.


Selected Publications

Ortloff, Charles, and Michael Moseley. 2012. 2600-1800 BCE Caral. Ñawpa Pacha 32(2):189-206.

Stanish, Charles, Edmundo de la Vega, Michael Moseley, Patrick Ryan Williams, Cecilia Chávez J., Benjamin Vining, and Karl LaFavre. 2010. Tiwanaku Trade Patterns in Southern Peru. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 29:524-532.

Sandweiss, Daniel H., Ruth Shady Solís, Michael E. Moseley, David K. Keefer, and Charles R. Ortloff. 2009. Environmental Change and Economic Development in Coastal Peru between 5,800 and 3,600 years ago. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106(5):1359-1363.

Moseley, Michael E., Christopher B. Donnan, and David K. Keefer. 2008. Convergent Catastrophe and the Demise of Dos Cabezas. In The Art and Archaeology of the Moche: An Ancient Andean Society of the Peruvian North Coast, edited by Steve Bourget and Kimberly L. Jones, pp. 81-91. University of Texas Press, Austin.

Moseley, Michael E., Donna J. Nash, Patrick Ryan Williams, Susan D. deFrance, Ana Miranda, and Mario Ruales. 2005. Burning Down the Brewery: Establishing and Evacuating an Ancient Imperial Colony at Cerro Baúl, Peru. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 102(48):17264-17271.

Williams, Patrick Ryan, Donna J. Nash, Michael E. Moseley, Susan deFrance, Mario Ruales, Ana Miranda, and David Goldstein. 2005. Los Encuentros y las Bases para la Administración Política Wari. Boletín de Arqueología PUCP 9:207-232.

Keefer, David K., and Michael E. Moseley. Southern Peru Desert Shattered by the Great 2001 Earthquake: Implications for Paleoseismic and Paleo-El Niño–Southern Oscillation Records. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 101(30):10878-10883.


Courses

The Inca and their Ancestors (ANG 5164 / ANT 3164)
Lost Tribes and Sunken Continents (ANT 2149)

Professor Emeritus

Interests

Transnational migration, Women’s roles in the United States, Gender roles cross-culturally, Anthropological theory, Anthropological ecology, Frontier agriculture, Brazil; United States; Paraguay

Programs

Cultural Anthropology

Personal Statement

My research specialties include Brazilian culture and society, international migration and gender roles cross-culturally. I have done field work in Brazil, Paraguay, and the United States. My most recent book, True to Her Nature (Waveland 2000), analyzes the material causes for shifts– from Colonial days to the present–in American attitudes towards women’s employment, housework and child care. Over the last decade my research has taken a new focus: Brazilian emigration to the United States. I conducted the first academic studies of this new migrant flow. This interest has resulted in the publication of two books, Little Brazil: Brazilian Immigrants in New York City (Princeton University Press, 1994) and An Invisible Minority: Brazilians in New York City (Allyn & Bacon 1998), as well as numerous articles. It has also led me to develop a course, Seminar in Transnational Migration.

Office
Grinter Hall
PO 117305
University of Florida
Gainesville, FL 32611-7305

Email : maxinem@ufl.edu

Professor Emeritus of Anthropology 
Office:
Phone:352-392-0375
Email: schmink@ufl.edu
Grinter Hall, Room 301

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Texas
  • B.A., University of Michigan

Research Interests

Tropical conservation and development, gender and development


Personal Statement

She has authored (with Charles H. Wood) Contested Frontiers in Amazonia (Columbia University Press, 1992),in addition to four edited books, and dozens of articles, book chapters, and reports. Since 1990, Dr. Schmink has directed a collaborative research program in Acre, Brazil, focused on community-based resource management. She has worked on issues related to gender and development for over twenty years. Dr. Schmink has had major grants from the Mellon Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, Ford Foundation, Hewlett Foundation, and Moore Foundation to support collaborative research and training programs at UF.