University of Florida Homepage

Graduate student Megan Hanna Fry receives the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) grant in Spring 2020. She shares a few of her thoughts below:

“I joined the department in the fall of 2018, working with Dr. John Krigbaum and Dr. James Davidson focusing in bioarchaeology. I received my B.A. from the University of Cincinnati, and in 2019 my M.A. from the University of Florida. In addition, I am the current Coordinating-Editor for the New Florida Journal of Anthropology. I was awarded the Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Science Foundation (NSF-GRF), starting fall 2020, which provides 3 years of funding toward my degree, allowing me to focus on my research and coursework.

In my research I broadly aim to understand settlement and social relations across Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms. I utilize isotope, funerary, and osteological data to investigate health and mobility in Early-Mediaeval Britain. More specifically, I am trying to answer questions about violent death and identity. I compare heavy and light isotope values to mortuary and skeletal trauma data to understand if victims of ritual violent death were more likely to be migrants during the 4th to 9th centuries.”

NSF SBE Postdoctoral Research Fellow
Courtesy Faculty
Office:  Turlington B119
Email: ezavodny@ufl.edu
Google Scholars

Research Interests

Human-environment interaction, sustainability, marginal environments, emergence of social complexity and inequality, European prehistory, origins of agriculture, animal husbandry and transhumance, faunal analysis, osteology, mortuary archaeology, stable isotope geochemistry, radiocarbon dating, and paleoclimate reconstruction


Selected Publications

2019 E. Zavodny, B. Culleton, S. McClure, J. Balen, D. Kennett. Recalibrating grave good chronologies: new AMS 14C dates from Bronze-Iron Age Lika, Croatia. Antiquity 93: 113-127.

2019 E. Zavodny, S. McClure, M. Welker, B. Culleton, J. Balen, D. Kennett. Scaling up: stable isotope evidence for the intensification of animal husbandry in Bronze-Iron Age Lika Croatia Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports 23: 1055-1065.

2017 E. Zavodny, B. Culleton, S. McClure, D. Kennett, J. Balen. Minimizing risk on the margins: insights on Iron Age agriculture from stable isotope analyses in central Croatia. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 48: 250-261.

2015 E. Zavodny, S. McClure, B. Culleton, E. Podrug, D. Kennett. Identifying Neolithic animal management practices in the Adriatic using stable isotopes. Documenta Praehistorica XLII: 261-274.

2014 E. Zavodny, S. McClure, B. Culleton, E. Podrug, D. Kennett. Neolithic animal management practices and stable isotope studies in the Adriatic. Environmental Archaeology 19(3): 184-195.

2013 G. Milner, G. Chaplin, E. Zavodny. Conflict and societal change in late prehistoric Eastern North America. Evolutionary Anthropology 22: 96-102.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Graduate Student
Email: m.hanna@ufl.edu


Education

  • Ph.D. Anthropology, University of Florida, In Progress
  • M.A. Anthropology, University of Florida, 2019
  • B.A. Anthropology, University of Cincinnati, 2016

Subfield

Archaeology

Biological Anthropology


Chair

Dr. John Krigbaum


Research Interests

Isotopes, Mobility, Diet Bioarchaeology, Osteology, Paleopathology, Demography, Mortuary Studies, 3D Modeling, Forensic Facial Reconstruction, Mediaeval Archaeology


Selected Publications

“The rs387907171 SNP inTYRP1is not associated with blond hair color on the Island ofBougainville”. American journal ofhuman biology. Heather L. Norton, Megan Hanna, Elizabeth Werren, Jonathan Friedlaender. 10/1/2015   https://doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.22795


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

  • Travel Award, University of Florida, Spring 2020
  • Elizabeth Eddy Endowment, University of Florida, 2019
  • Grinter Fellowship, University of Florida, 2018-2019
  • Taft Undergraduate Summer Fellowship, University of Cincinnati, 2016
  • Taft Undergraduate Enrichment Award, University of Cincinnati, 2015
  • STEM Field School Award, University of Cincinnati, 2015
  • Taft Undergraduate Summer Fellowship, University of Cincinnati, 2015
  • STEM Field School Award, University of Cincinnati, 2015

Graduate Student
Email: kbermudez@ufl.edu


Education

  • Ph.D.
  • M.A. Anthropology, University of Florida, In Progress
  • B.S. Geology with a minor in Geography, University of Florida 2012

Subfield

Archaeology

Biological Anthropology


Chair

Dr. John Krigbaum


Research Interests

Human Osteology, Bioarchaeology, Forensic Anthropology, Elemental and Isotopic Geochemistry


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

Photo of Kylie Williamson

Graduate Student
Email: kylie.williamson@ufl.edu


Education

  • Ph.D. Anthropology, University of Florida, In Progress
  • M.A. Anthropology, University of Florida, 2017
  • B.A. Yale University, 2015

Subfield

Archaeology

Biological Anthropology 


Chair

Dr. John Krigbaum


Research Interests

Osteology, Stable Isotopes, Paleopathology, Bioarchaeology


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

Photo of Kate Kolpan

Alumni

Email: kkolpan@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D.,
  • M.A.,
  • B.A.,

Subfield

Archaeology / Biological


Chair

Dr. John Krigbaum


Research Interests

Osteology, Isotope Analysis, Bioarchaeology, Human-Environment Interaction, Contemporary and Conflict Archaeology, World War II, Germany, the Balkans


Selected Publications

 

 


Grants, Fellowships, and Awards

 

This student has graduated from the program so the information on this page may not be current.

Photo of professor Daegling
Professor
Office: Turlington Hall, Room B376
Phone: (352) 294-7603
Email: daegling@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D. Anthropology, Stony Brook University, 1990
  • M.A. Anthropology, Stony Brook University, 1989
  • B.A. Anthropology, Pitzer College, 1982

Research Interests

Biomechanical modeling, skeletal structures, occlusal dental microwear, functional morphology, primates, skeletal biomechanics, morphometrics, craniofacial skeletons, locomotor skeletons, primate evolution, human evolution, Côte d’Ivoire


Personal Statement

The overarching aim of my research is the development of methods and collection of data to enhance the quality of functional and adaptive inference in the paleontological record, particularly with respect to primate and human evolution. To this end, I have research foci in the areas of 1) biomechanical modeling of skeletal structures, 2) occlusal dental microwear and 3) the functional morphology of the monkeys of Taï Forest (Côte d’Ivoire). With respect to the latter work, my skeletal biomechanics and morphometrics laboratory conducts research on the material and structural properties of the craniofacial and locomotor skeletons of cercopithecoid monkeys as part of the Taï Monkey Project.


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

  • 2011 – present  Professor of Anthropology, University of Florida
  • 2000 – 2011 Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Florida
  • 1999 – 2000 Associate Professor of Basic Medical Sciences, California College of Podiatric Medicine
  • 1994 – 1999 Associate Professor of Anthropology, Yale University
  • 1992 – 1993 Visiting Assistant Professor of Biological Anthropology & Anatomy, Duke University
  • 1990 – 1994 Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Yale University

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

  • American Association of Physical Anthropologists
  • National Center for Science Education

Honors

  • 2016 University of Florida Research Foundation Professorship
  • 2015 Colonel Allan R. and Margaret G. Crow Term Professor of Anthropology, UF
  • 2010 Colonel Allan R. and Margaret G. Crow Term Professor of Anthropology, UF
  • 1996 Yale University Senior Faculty Fellowship in the Social Sciences
  • 1992 Yale University Junior Faculty Fellowship in the Social Sciences
  • 1989 Oschinsky-McKern Award, Canadian Association for Physical Anthropology
  • 1988 Mildred Trotter Award, American Association of Physical Anthropologists

Selected Publications

Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

Biomechanical modeling of skeletal structures

The focus of this work is to develop and test models that chharacterize stress and strain profiles and are applicable to comparative samples. Representative publications:

  • Rapoff, A.J., McGraw, W.S., Duque, A., Daegling, D.J. 2017. Brief communication: Correlation between elastic modulus and radiographic density in mandibular cortical bone of colobine monkeys. Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 163:187-91.
  • Daegling D.J., Granatosky, M.C., McGraw, W.S. 2014. Spatial patterning of bone stiffness in the anterior mandibular corpus of Macaca fascicularis: Implications for models of bone adaptation. Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 156:649-660 doi: 10.1002/ajpa.22682.
  • Daegling, D.J. 2002. Estimation of torsional rigidity in primate long bones. J. Human Evol. 43: 229-239.

Dental Microwear

This work investigates the impact of diet and ingestive behavior in the formation of occlusal microwear, with the aim of improving dietary inference in the fossil record. Representative publications:

  • Daegling, D.J., Hua, L-C., Ungar, P.S. 2016.The role of food stiffness in dental microwear feature formation. Archs. Oral Biol. 71:16-23.
  • Daegling, D.J., McGraw, W.S., Ungar, P.S., Pampush, J.D., Vick, A.E., Bitty, A.E. 2011. Hard-object feeding in sooty mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) and interpretation of early hominin feeding ecology. PLoS ONE 6(8): e23095.
  • Daegling, D.J. and Grine, F.E. 1994. Bamboo feeding, dental microwear, and diet of the Pleistocene ape Gigantopithecus blacki. S. Afr. J. Sci. 90: 527-532.

Paleoanthropology

My research in the hominin fossil record is focused on functional and biomechanical inference with respect to mastication, with a view toward understanding linkages between feeding ecology and morphology. Representative publications:

  • Daegling, D.J., Carlson, K.J., Tafforeau, P., De Ruiter, D.J., Berger, L.R. 2016. Comparative biomechanics of Australopithecus sediba mandibles. J. Human Evol. 100:73-86.
  • Daegling, D.J., Judex, S., Ozcivici, E., Ravosa, M.J., Taylor, A.T., Grine, F.E., Teaford, M.F., Ungar, P.S. 2013. Viewpoints: Feeding mechanics, diet, and dietary adaptations in early hominins. Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 151:356-371. doi: 10.1002/ajpa.22281.
  • Daegling, D.J. and Grine, F.E. 2017. Feeding behavior and diet in Paranthropus boisei: the limits of functional inference from the mandible. In: Marom, A., Hovers, E. (eds): Human Paleontology and Prehistory: Contributions in Honor of Yoel Rak, Vertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoanthropology Series, Springer International, pp 109-125. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-46646-0_9.

Science Education and Skeptical Inquiry

Are there unknown apes roaming about the North American wilderness? Representative publications:

  • Daegling, D.J. 2004. Bigfoot Exposed: An Anthropologist Examines America’s Enduring Legend. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press.
  • Daegling, D.J. and Schmitt, D.O. 1999. Bigfoot’s Screen Test. Skeptical Inquirer 23 (3): 20-25.

Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

National Science Foundation
  • 2014 – 2017
  • “Biomechanical significance of bone material variation in the primate locomotor skeleton”
  • Lead PI on collaborative grant

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

 

Courses Taught

 

krigbaum

Professor and Undergraduate Coordinator
Office: Turlington Hall, Room 1350A
Phone: (352) 294-7540
Email: krigbaum@ufl.edu

Education

  • Ph.D.
  • M.A.
  • B.A.

Research Interests

Paleoanthropology, Bioarchaeology, Human Osteology, Paleopathology, Paleodiet Reconstruction, Southeast Asia


Personal Statement


Positions and Honors

Positions and Employment

Other Experience and Professional Memberships

Honors

 


Selected Publications

Hastings, Alexander K., John Krigbaum, David W. Steadman, and Nancy A. Albury. 2014. Domination by Reptiles in a Terrestrial Food Web of the Bahamas Prior to Human Occupation. Journal of Herpetology (In-Press).

Kurin, Danielle S., Ellen M. Lofaro, D. E. Gómez Choque, and John Krigbaum. 2014. A Bioarchaeological and Biogeochemical Study of Warfare and Mobility in Andahuaylas, Peru (ca. ad 1160–1260). International Journal of Osteoarchaeology (In press).

Adams, Justin W., Anthony D.T. Kegley, and John Krigbaum. 2013. New Faunal Stable Carbon Isotope Data from the Haasgat HGD Assemblage, South Africa, Including the First Reported Values for Papio angusticeps and Cercopithecoides haasgati. Journal of Human Evolution 64:693-698.

Krigbaum, John, Michael H. Berger, David J. Daegling, and W. Scott McGraw. 2013. Stable Isotope Canopy Effects for Sympatric Monkeys at Taï Forest, Côte d’Ivoire. Biology Letters 9(4):20130466.

Krigbaum, John, Scott M. Fitzpatrick, and Jamie Bankaitis. 2013. Human Paleodiet at Grand Bay, Carriacou, Lesser Antilles. The Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 8:210-227.

Secord, Ross, Jonathan I. Bloch, Stephen G.B. Chester, Doug M. Boyer, Aaron R. Wood, Scott L. Wing, Mary J. Kraus, Francesca A. McInerney, and John Krigbaum. 2012. Evolution of the Earliest Horses Driven by Climate Change in the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Science 335(6071):959-962.

Coutts, Karen Harvey, Alejando Chu, and John Krigbaum. 2011. Paleodiet in Late Preceramic Peru: Preliminary Isotopic Data from Bandurria. The Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 6:196-210.

Secord, Ross, Jonathan Bloch, Stephen Chester, Doug Boyer, and John Krigbaum. 2011. Forest Structure, Climate, and Timing of Mammalian Immigrations during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum in North America. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 31:192-192.

More Publications Available on Google Scholar


Contribution to Science

 


Research Support

Ongoing Research Support

Completed Research Support (within the past three years)

Courses Taught

Dr. Michael Warren

Associate Professor

Email: mwarren@ufl.edu
Pound Lab

Education

  • Ph.D.
  • M.A.
  • B.A.

Research Interests

Warren’s areas of interest include forensic identification and trauma analysis, human variation, and the relationship between the environment and body form. His current project is a collaborative effort with Dr. David Daegling, examining the mechanism of trauma in rib and mandibular fractures. Warren recently co-authored an introductory textbook on forensic anthropology. As both a UF graduate student and faculty member, Warren has been contributing to the Pound Lab’s casework since 1991. He has also assisted with personal identification in mass disasters, and helped to identify, and document war crimes against, the victims of genocide in Bosnia, Serbia and Kosovo.


Selected Publications

Van Deest, Traci L., Michael W. Warren, and Katelyn L. Bolhofner. 2012. Advances in the Anthropological Analysis of Cremated Remains. In A Companion to Forensic Anthropology, edited by Dennis Dirkmaat, pp. 418-431. Wiley-Blackwell, Malden, MA.

Warren, Michael W., Traci Van Deest, and Kristina Ballard. 2011. Quality Assurance as Pedagogy for Academic Forensic Anthropology Laboratories. Forensic Science Policy & Management 2(2):70-74.

Warren, Michael W., Heather A. Walsh-Haney, and Laurel Freas, eds. 2008. The Forensic Anthropology Laboratory. CRC Press, Boca Raton.

Daegling, David J., Michael W. Warren, Jennifer L. Hotzman, and Casey J. Self. 2008. Structural Analysis of Human Rib Fracture and Implications for Forensic Interpretation. Journal of Forensic Sciences 53(6):1301-1307.


Courses

Advanced Techniques in Forensic Anthropology (ANG 6740)
Human Osteology and Osteometry (ANG 5525)
Human Osteology (ANT 4525)
Skeleton Keys: Forensic Identification (ANT 3520)